Avaya StaffApril 11, 2017

The 2020 Network Is Here: Stop Visualizing and Start Deploying

At this point, it’s safe to say you’ve heard of digital transformation and the radical changes it’s driving within the enterprise as we approach the 2020 network. For example, up to 45% of activities that employees are paid to perform can now be automated. Companies are working overtime to identify security solutions that defend against vulnerabilities found in 70% of IoT devices today. The average business now offers customers up to nine engagement channels to be used across a vast array of devices.

Organizational boundaries are blurring. The speed of change has become relentless. Networking as we know it has been redefined. All of this, of course, has significantly changed the role of IT within the modern-day enterprise.

The days of troubleshooting computers and running phone lines are dead and gone. Today, IT represents the foundation for numerous key areas of business, many that far surpass the norm. CIOs are emerging as leaders of customer-facing functions, responsible for driving digital user experiences organization-wide. Business owners are strategically using IT to accelerate their core revenue-generating activities. Half are now collecting ideas through business unit workshops facilitated by IT. Driven by digital transformation, IT has changed to the point of no return.

Digital transformation, however, is far from over. Research makes it clear we’re only getting started. Consider the vast changes expected to occur over the next three years alone. Gartner predicts that by 2020:

  • 100 million consumers will shop in virtual reality
  • 30% of web browsing sessions will be done without a screen
  • Algorithms will positively alter the behavior of billions of global workers

By 2021, 20% of all activities will involve at least one of seven digital giants like Amazon, Facebook, or Apple. By 2022, a blockchain-based business will be worth an estimated $10 billion. It’s clear the potential of trends like the IoT, cloud, big data analytics, and robotics is far from fulfilled and will only accelerate substantially as we move forward.

This all leads to one very important question: what will the network of 2020 look like? This massive, continued change will surely place unprecedented demand on IT infrastructure looking ahead.

Almost a year ago, Principal Analyst at ZK Research, Zeus Kerravala, aimed to answer this question via an article published to Network World. In it, he outlined key challenges that lie ahead for companies looking to capitalize on digital transformation (i.e., lack of automation, nodal configuration, multicast deployments), as well as what the network of 2020 will look like. Terms like simplified, mobile-centric, enhanced for contextualized customer experiences, and hyper-converged rounded out a comprehensive list of components, all which are just as valid today as they were this time last year.

Over the last year, however, Avaya has worked to streamline the 2020 network by condensing the technology into five key areas that businesses across every industry must consider: deep and wide automation, improved scalability, built-in security, mesh architecture, and an open network ecosystem.

Five Key Areas of the 2020 Network Every Business Must Know

  1. Deep and wide automation:

    As enterprises start aligning IT around their core business priorities, they must work to support two levels of automation: the first for automating the network architecture itself, and the second for automating various business workflows. The first involves eliminating complex, nodal configurations(traditionally required for service deployment) in order to easily add capacity and scaling capabilities. The second involves adopting a powerful, open workflow engine to increase productivity and overall efficiency. Network and workflow automation are essential for achieving the utmost business success.

  2. Scalability:

    Traditionally, scaling your architecture required that you replace your existing nodes with faster ones. In today’s smart, digital world, however, companies must evolve traditional scalability from legacy hierarchal architecture to fabric-based architecture. This move will enable them to add capacity at will and simulate nodal configuration, much like VMWare did with the introduction of server virtualization. The industry needs an end-to-end simplified virtualized network.

  3. Built-in security:

    The static configuration of legacy architecture will never offer the right level of network security needed today, nor will it support the future of the CX. As such, companies must work to eliminate legacy downfall when deploying next-generation architecture. This means sharpening the blurry, gray areas of network security—for example, when employees’ devices begin fading in and out of Wi-Fi when roaming in the parking lot. With more connected devices and more ways than ever to compromise them, it’s imperative that the 2020 network deliver any-to-any, end-to-end, built-in security. In other words, end-to-end network segmentation complemented by sophisticated authentication, encryption where needed, and real-time threat protection.

  4. Meshed architecture:

    The 2020 network epitomizes freedom of deployment. It means companies can move away from traditional hierarchal deployment and finally mesh their architecture. No more linearly connecting parts. No more limitations of Ethernet loops. A natively meshed architecture will empower organizations with unparalleled resiliency and scalability end to end (not just within the data center). At universities, for example, this means hyper-segmented, end-to-end connection across multiple campuses. At a bank, this kind of connectivity can be deployed between branch sites taking full advantage of cloud-based services. The user possibilities and business outcomes are seemingly endless.

  5. Open ecosystem:

    We live in a world of software-defined everything: SD-WAN SD-storage, SD-data center. The fact is that we’re rapidly and inevitably moving towards an open-sourced ecosystem. To prepare for this reality, businesses must ensure those vendors they invest in offer open APIs. This enables them to truly customize solution features and capabilities to meet their exact business needs. The 2020 network will no longer just endorse proprietary systems—but businesses need to continue to be cautious about how to take full advantage of open-source code without increasing business risks through vulnerabilities.

It’s imperative that organizations educate themselves on the 2020 network, not only visualizing it but taking the necessary steps for deployment. The future of networking is here, and it’s going to influence and shape your business. To learn more about these five key areas of the 2020 network, read IDC’s all-new Networks 2020 preparedness report, sponsored by Avaya.