IoT Chronicles: Demystification & Strategy | Part 1 Avaya Blog Series

The IoT Chronicles Part 1: Demystification and Strategy

If you follow my blog, then you know I talk a lot about the Internet of Things (IoT). As Avaya’s Chief Technologist for Software Defined Architecture, I love to discuss the IoT, a vast topic that I believe all business leaders should continuously educate themselves on. (See my recent blog and my colleague Mark Fletcher’s blog about the possibilities and outcomes of smarter public safety and emergency response—something that affects every one of us.)

With research indicating that the next decade will be marked by record IoT growth—some firms expect revenue to break into the trillions—it’s never a bad idea to revisit the fundamentals. There’s no question the IoT is hot right now, but businesses need to buckle down and take the right steps that will make a lasting impact. Leaders must have a solid understanding of the IoT and, most importantly, what it means for their organizations outside all the hype. While the IoT offers ample opportunity for innovation and growth, there are undoubtedly key considerations that must be made for seeing success.

So, hype aside, what do you need to know about the IoT? This is the first in a this four-part blog series, a crash course on the ever-growing world of connected “things”—from top challenges to solutions to predictions and trends. Got your pencil and paper? Good, let’s get started…

What is the IoT?

Let’s start with the basics: what exactly is the IoT? The term has been tossed around so much that you’d think by now you’d have an inherent understanding of it. Like many other concepts though, definitions vary and can be subject to opinion.

Wikipedia, for instance, defines the IoT as “the internetworking of physical devices, vehicles, buildings and other items that are embedded with software, sensors and network connectivity capabilities that enable these objects to collect and exchange data.” This definition isn’t inaccurate; however, the way I see it, anything that can connect to either a network or provide any sort of service (not just data collection and exchange) should be considered part of the IoT.

We may be living in an age full of wearable technologies and 4/5G-enabled devices, but who’s to say that older technologies like printers, digital and analog phones or first-generation video conferencing systems aren’t part of the IoT? If anything, these were significant predecessors that paved the way to IoT greatness.

My point is that the IoT is very loosely defined in today’s market, but the end goal is the same: create automated (and in many cases data-driven) processes that generate the exact business outcome you’re looking for.

What kinds of outcomes? Imagine a sensor that can detect a forest fire and send out real-time notifications to emergency response teams to prevent it from spreading. Consider a 4G-connected car that can detect a flat tire and immediately notify the nearest repairman. Picture bank tellers that can identify customers (or criminals) as soon as they walk through the door via facial recognition. The use cases for IoT are truly endless, which is why we at Avaya define the IoT as simply having an open scope. Virtually anything can be considered part of the IoT, and so anything is possible.

How to Create Your Best IoT Approach

Do a quick Google search on the IoT and you’ll see all sorts of results like, “The IoT Is Far Bigger Than Anyone Realizes” or “How People Are Using the IoT.” These are good pieces of information, but how many resources are out there for helping you create the best IoT approach for your specific organization? What steps should you take? What steps can you take given your circumstances? You must consider such things as budgets and internal bandwidth to ensure you properly invest in and get the most value out of IoT.

I can’t give you a custom-tailored IoT strategy on the fly (although that’s something we at Avaya can help you map out and execute in time). What I can do right now is shed light on the reality of the IoT, and how businesses can leverage it in a positive way.

The first step to figuring out how the IoT can deliver proactive, positive outcomes for your business is to look at your specific vertical needs. It’s critical that businesses understand the vertical-specific nature of the IoT. Every industry has its own set of opportunities, as well as its own set of challenges to overcome.

For instance, within a hospital, there’s the critical need for fully secure connectivity between life-saving medical devices, as well as the need to seamlessly and immediately deliver patient data to medical staff. Meanwhile, a financial institution is concerned with how to guarantee account protection and secure financial transactions while providing a personalized experience for customers. A retailer may be focused on detecting the proximity of a customer in order to push relevant promotions based on big data analytics.

Every industry is centered on different yet equally important business outcomes that lead to better customer experiences. Needless to say, you’ll fall 10 steps behind your competitors if you partner with a provider that touts a “one-size-fits-all” IoT platform.

Steps You Can Take Now for IoT Success

So, after you finish reading this, what can you begin doing to set yourself up for IoT success? One question you can ask yourself in terms of security (a massive IoT concern I’ll be tackling in Part 2 of this series) is: “Am I segmenting my network to ensure no one can see my connected devices, or access those devices without proper authorization?” I’ll be digging deeper into this in Part 2. In the meantime, read up on end-to-end network segmentation.

To make a lasting impact, you should also avoid a siloed IoT approach at all costs (or break your existing siloed approach). All lines of business (LOBs) must move at one unified pace of innovation to produce better business outcomes and customer experiences. I can’t stress the importance of this cross-LOB initiative enough. If one department is adding connected devices, you must ensure those devices can intelligently connect to all other LOBs. In today’s smart, digital world, the IoT is rooted in being able to seamlessly and intelligently gather and share data organization-wide. Today, tangible ROI and benefits are found in enterprise-wide connectivity and data exchange.

Coming up: In part 2 of this series, I’ll address the elephant in the room when it comes to the IoT: security.

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