How to Explain Cloud Projects to a CFO

How to Explain Cloud Projects to a CFO

As tensions continue to increase in cloud-related discussions at the executive level, so has the importance of effective communication. Much of the debate on cloud investments revolves around one topic: OpEx. It’s understandable why many financial experts seek to avoid OpEx, but the value of investing in cloud services lies beyond this range.

An effective method to bridge this gap is to build a strategic plan, so that you are prepared to let the facts speak for themselves. This method allows for pure business value to be presented, while also giving equal consideration to the weaknesses and challenges faced. Common ground may also be easier to establish when both parties enter the discussion with a clear understanding of the advantages and disadvantages. It’s too easy to let tensions and emotions direct the conversation, so instead present a case grounded in research and thoughtful consideration. The following five tips will assist you in establishing a tested, well-developed plan for cloud implementation.

  1. Gather Research and Data (Know Your Numbers)

    Start by researching case studies that contain TCO (total cost of ownership) and the cost of production for comparable applications. Also consider watching demonstrations to learn how functionality works and how workflows can be implemented—this is pure empirical evidence that companies can try to replicate or expand upon.

    To further pique the interest of your CFO, share data that enumerates how your company will gain a high ROI—this will have the greatest impact on the direction of your conversation.

  2. Consider Feasibility

    Gauge the necessity of the cloud products/services under consideration by analyzing the scale of the project. Develop your own internal criteria based on the particular delivery timeframes, budget, global accessibility, etc. Then compare how your research matches specific project requirements and identify any challenges upfront. Standard guidelines also help to objectively compare applications and ultimately identify the greatest potential benefits. An additional area of consideration is security. There are a number of controls in the area of access, encryption and legal compliance issues, both global and domestic that must be addressed. Although this may seem like a no-brainer, it is often forgotten in the complicated world of cloud considerations.

    In everyday life it’s easier to see the folly in taking on a big endeavor without a coordinated plan. Imagine preparing for a dinner party without knowing how many guests will attend, when they are coming, if they have any dietary restrictions or allergies, and then attempting to cook this meal without a recipe—failure and chaos are expected, if not unavoidable. Luckily, through careful preparation all these mistakes can be easily avoided and the same is true for cloud implementation.

  3. Adopt Standards
    Creating standards is an absolute prerequisite for implementing cloud services, especially when using an agile process. You won’t get the full benefit of cloud if you don’t have standards. Self-service capabilities can be dramatically expanded through the use of standards at all tiers of the infrastructure and application development landscape.

    Examples of these standards include operating systems, middleware, communication protocols, storage access, development tools, development processes, development coding standards, monitoring, alert plans, scaling practices, and even server hardening practices. Additionally, security controls and individual corporate business models are also standards that should be considered. If you are planning a private cloud, ideally you would already have standards in place for the server infrastructure, storage, and networking—in addition to the items listed above. The goal of standardization across an environment is to create simplicity and consistency, which drives automation—the foundation of cloud in an SP-based or private cloud environment.

  4. Create a Prototype Environment
    This experimental approach provides the opportunity to try before you buy and is certain to impress your CFO. A prototype environment serves as proof of concept, which tests if the service is technically and operationally feasible. There are two main considerations within this.

    First is your ability to create and leverage the basic infrastructure as a service, IaaS, offered in your own cloud or that of a service provider. It’s the best way to obtain computing infrastructure without the capital investment. You will be paying for usage on a monthly basis, but ensure it is properly managed so budgets are not exceeded. Again, preparation is key! Get ready to tackle this concern head on and create a plan for how you will manage any issues. IaaS can be a great way to start a development process or even set up a production application deployment.

    Next, determine how it will impact your development process. Two important metrics to track include increased development speed and improvement in the overall cycle of development and testing. This can be achieved by leveraging the standards you have adopted and deployed in your cloud environment, which can be further enhanced by adoption of a DevOps model within your development teams and process.

  5. Think Scalable
    Managing cloud operations is different from rolling out a large capital-intensive project. Cloud services and features can be added and removed dynamically. With proper configuration and standards this can be truly elastic. However, you need to manage within an allocation to ensure you do not overconsume resources and create a negative budget impact. The benefit of it is to spend at the level you need to consume. But you would need to monitor the usage on an on-going basis to ensure that growing the allocation is a premeditated decision with proper budget consideration. Cloud itself cannot be a set-and-forget environment.

    Over time, the benefits of cloud investments compound as infrastructure and labor cost savings are realized through automation, workflow, self-service, etc. So, it’s important to fully seize the opportunity to communicate this tremendous value by directing the conversation to the facts. If you have given thoughtful consideration to the strengths and weakness of these topics, then you are in a better position to objectively analyze the full potential of cloud implementation. This knowledge will let you minimize the emotion of the conversation and develop a strong, well-informed position. With these tips in mind, you are fully prepared to put nebulous cloud conversations in the past.

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