Interop 2015: It’s Time for the Internet of Business Things

Is the Internet of Things ready for the enterprise? It’s a question that’s front-and-center in my mind as Avaya gears up for this year’s Interop conference in Las Vegas.

To help frame the question, consider the parallels between what’s currently happening with the Internet of Things and what has already occurred in the Application Service Provider model.

Not too long ago, Application Service Delivery dominated the headlines of trade publications and thought leadership articles. The concept–that enterprises wanted to host their software applications externally–was sound. ASP launched with great promise, but never managed to gain widespread adoption.

Later, Salesforce.com launched, introducing Software-as-a-Service into the enterprise vernacular.

Instead of a vendor hosting lots of instances of unique software applications, the vendor hosted its own application, and delivered the entire solution over the Web in a multi-tenant model.

SaaS was more economical, faster to deploy and more scalable than ASP. SaaS took the core concept of ASP (that enterprises wanted to host their software applications externally) but refined the model, finally making it viable for business.

Parallels with IoT

Similarly, there’s a lot of hype around the Internet of Things.

Experts envision a world where each of us will own or interact with dozens of Internet-connected devices each day–turning on Internet–connected lightbulbs on our way to our Internet-connected refrigerators, our smartphones gathering biometric data from our Internet-connected wristwatches, getting into our Internet-connected cars to commute to work. Once we get to work, our Internet-connected devices will interact with the enterprise, giving us access to the network and federated business applications.

The concept behind enterprise IoT–that mobility will permanently and positively impact business–is sound.

But like the ASP-to-SaaS trend, it seems that practical models have yet to emerge to cause IoT to go mainstream in the enterprise. In a very focused way, Avaya has introduced the beginning of what will likely be a practical implementation of IoT for business.

The Internet of Business Things

Look around any large office–there are hundreds, if not thousands–of Internet-connected devices. These devices are critical for business and can consume an enormous amount of IT time to configure, secure and maintain.

Last year, Avaya introduced the capability for IT staff to simply plug a known device (such as a network switch, wireless access point or video surveillance camera) into an Ethernet port, and automatically be recognized by an enterprise-wide networking fabric, which provisions a secure virtual network instance and maintain that configuration dynamically. The benefits to the enterprise are immense–IT staff can now focus on strategic projects rather than rote device configuration.

SDN Fx

What about unknown devices? Most companies have thousands of Internet-connected devices they’d like to get on the network in a secure manner.

Avaya recently announced its software-defined networking architecture, SDN Fx. One of the key features is the Open Networking Adapter. Simply plug unknown devices into the Open Networking Adapter, a device that’s about the size of a deck of cards.

An Open Daylight-powered controller associates the Open Networking Adapter to the device, now making it a known device. Once associated, all services and security policies follow the device. Those permissions get reset and disabled if the device is removed from the networking environment.

Workers simply connect the adapters themselves, allowing the automated process to fully configure the device. This reduces operational costs and frees up IT staff for more strategic tasks.

For the Internet of Business Things to become a reality, we need to improve the delivery model for the concept–much like SaaS did with the concept behind ASP. Avaya’s SDN Fx is the delivery model that will make the Internet of Business Things practical and widespread.

We’ll be demonstrating this capability (and showing off the Open Networking Adapter) at Interop booth #2033. Join us to see what the future of IoT in the enterprise looks like.

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