How Customer Service Tools are Going Mobile

A number of retailers are allowing their customers to download smartphone applications that connect them to their e-commerce websites, giving them the ability to search for and purchase products from virtually anywhere.

In order give customers a strong support system, many merchandisers offering mobile apps are implementing live help technology to provide assistance to those who have questions about items.

Taking a page from CRM 
Salesforce.com, one of the world’s signature providers of customer relationship management tools, recently debuted an application that connects customers to representatives with the touch of a button.

This tool has primarily been used by organizations offering services, as opposed to products. Typically, users customize the application so it connects certain customers with specific salespeople. CRM is all about creating familiarity and building relationships between buyers and sellers – a difficult endeavor for nationwide retailers catering to hundreds of thousands of customers a day.

Just because establishing an empathetic connection with a such a large number of consumers is arduous doesn’t mean companies should view the initiative as impossible. In many regards, people are relatively high maintenance when it comes to obtaining assistance. Equipping help center employees with rudimentary call handling technology isn’t a good tactic to employ.

Integrating the smartphone 
In the past, it was likely that a contact center utilized more advanced technology than customers. Today, the tables have turned, and consumers are more tech savvy than they were fifteen years ago. As a result, people commonly expect corporations generating millions of dollars in annual revenue to possess customer service tools that would make a smartphone appear obsolete.

According to Call Centre Helper contributor Neil Titcomb, a report conducted by British research firm Gensys discovered that only 20 percent of companies currently have a mobile consumer assistance application. Although cloud computing has made employing such technology possible, there are still a large number of consumers who cannot browse a Web page on a smartphone and correspond with a help desk employee simultaneously because many companies have failed to implement the appropriate software.

However, the companies that allow people to communicate with them in such a manner can employ mobile screen sharing, which allows a representative to help a caller navigate a website. One particular program powered by Genesys contains a contact icon that enables individuals to select their preferred method for speaking with an employee. Once customers make their choice, the representative receiving the inquiry is informed of what tool the callers are using before the connection is established.

“The agent will thus have a full overview of who the customer is and what they have been trying to achieve prior to the contact,” wrote Titcomb. “This process ensures that the customer communicates with the best agent available to resolve the concern, while the agent will have the necessary information to resolve that concern, and resolve it quickly.”

People interact with each other through multiple devices and communicative means. From a basic phone call to instant screen sharing, it’s imperative for companies to provide their employees with the necessary support software.

* * *

This article originally appeared on the LiveLOOK blog, and is reprinted with permission.