Case Study: Onshoring Elevates Customer Experience for Music Pioneer's Credit Card Company

Russell Simmons, record producer, reality TV star and businessman created RushCard a decade ago to provide clients with a prepaid, fee-free debit card option. Simmons, the co-founder of hip hop music label Def Jam and creator of the Phat Farm clothing brand, set out with the goal of better serving consumers who have been excluded due to credit checks, minimum balances and existing bank account requirements.

Mitch Mann, Senior Director of Customer Service at RushCard said, “Our strategy is centered on delivering the best service possible to customers.”

rushcard screenshot

Credit: Rushcard.com

NeoVox Global operates the core of RushCard’s 24/7 call center, fueled by Avaya solutions including Avaya Aura® Platform 6.0, Avaya Aura® Contact Center, Avaya IQ, Avaya SBC and Avaya one-X® Agent.

“When considering Neovox, the fact that they had 100% uptime on the Avaya platform was definitely a factor,” Mann said. Avaya IQ produces real-time reports on a customized dashboard to monitor call volume, hold times, abandon rates, etc. “RushCard has 100 percent visibility into the queue to see real-time data about their account,” said Will Westmoreland, Vice President of Sales at Neovox Global. Avaya skills-based call routing ensures that RushCard customers are connected with the agent who can help them the best. The “whisper” feature delivers a snapshot of the incoming customer call to the agent to increase efficiency.

Most people have experienced a horrible call center interaction at least once in their lifetime. Generally starting with a robot and ending with frustrated yelling into the receiver. Today, RushCard customers can reach a live person 24/7 and get routed to the best agent available. Customer satisfaction scores have shot up over 12 percent overall.  Agents are now 12% more likely to resolve customer issued on the first try.  Average call times are 47 seconds shorter.  What a rush for the contact center manager!

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3 CX Stats That May Change How You Think About Digital Transformation

Technologies like Artificial Intelligence, automation, big data, and the Internet of Things have made digital transformation an absolute necessity for organizations. With people, processes, services and things more dynamically connected than ever, companies are feeling relentless pressure to digitize, simplify, and integrate their organizational structures to remain competitive.

But there’s a big hole in the fabric of most digital transformation (DX) plans: the customer experience (CX). The problem isn’t that companies fail to understand the importance of the CX in relation to digital transformation. Rather, most fail to understand their customers well enough to envision a truly customer-centric, digitally-transformed environment. Just consider that 55% of companies cite “evolving customer behaviors and preferences” as their primary driver of digital change. Yet, the number one challenge facing executives today is understanding customer behavior and impact.

A massive part of digital transformation involves building a CX strategy, and yet customer centricity remains a top challenge for most. In fact, I encourage you to be your own customer within your organization. Walk in your customers’ shoes, contact your organization as your customers would. What was your web experience? Was the expert knowledgeable during a chat conversation? How well did the mobile app work for you? Did you have a connected experience? Given your experience, how brand-loyal would you be to your organization?

Here are three statistics that will get you rethinking your CX strategy in relation to digital transformation:

  1. 52% of companies don’t share customer intelligence outside of the contact center. In other words, over half of companies are limiting the customer journey to the contact center even though it naturally takes place across multiple key areas of business (i.e., sales, marketing, HR, billing). Businesses must ensure customers are placed with the right resource at the right time, whether it’s in a contact center or non-contact center environment. The key is being able to openly share customer data across all teams, processes and customer touchpoints.
  2. 60% of digital analytics investments will be spent on customer journey analytics by 2018. Customer journey analytics—the process of measuring the end-to-end customer journey across the entire organization—is critical in today’s smart, digital world. Companies are rapidly investing in this area to identify opportunities for process improvement, digitization, automation and, ultimately, competitive differentiation.
  3. 60% of customers change their contact channel depending on where they are and what they’re doing. This means organizations must focus less on service and more on contextual and situational awareness. Businesses must work to create a seamless experience—regardless of device, channel, location or time—supported by customer, business and situational context captured across all touchpoints.

The CX should influence every company’s digital transformation story. For more tips, insights, and impactful statistics check out our eBook, Fundamentals of Digital Transformation. Let me know what you think. We look forward to hearing from you.

3 Key Steps to Starting Your Company-wide Digital Transformation

Stats show that 80% of companies identify “digital transformation” as their top strategic priority—but only 5% feel they’ve mastered it. Why the gap? Achieving a digital experience to a point of competitive differentiation requires organizational alignment. Digital transformation represents a crucial paradigm shift across the entire organization, yet research suggests only a fraction of companies currently implement an enterprise-wide digital strategy. To successfully digitize, all lines of business (LOB) must be aligned and move in concert towards digital innovation. This involves communication and collaboration among key stakeholders, especially senior executives, across every business unit—even ones you wouldn’t typically include.

Put simply, digital transformation is more than just digitizing your infrastructure before your competitors do. Yes, it’s about serving the growing number of digital consumers faster and better. But, more importantly, it requires a shift in organizational mindset and redefinition of business processes. The starting point for any digital transformation initiative should be a clear understanding among all business leaders (not just IT) about the nature, direction and projected outcomes of the transformation.

What does the discovery process look like? It can be summed up in three key steps:

  1. Situational Assessment: Executives across every LOB need to weigh in and agree on business drivers and expectations. Insights derived from this assessment should be used to map out short- and long-term business goals and key digital strategies to ensure organizational alignment.
  2. Opportunity Prioritization: Identify target applications and technology architectures, then determine how these new solutions will affect existing technologies and align with core needs (i.e., operational savings, CX improvements). In parallel, use this time to identify, analyze and prioritize gaps between existing and planned processes.
  3. Roadmap Creation: A detailed roadmap helps you finalize digitization plans before implementation. It should outline phasing strategy sequences, risk mitigation plans, and project feasibility reports that define the timeline, dependencies, costs (and return) and controls of each digital initiative. Consider this your digital transformation playbook.

Digital transformation is the foundation of how organizations will succeed or fail. Check out our eBook, Fundamentals of Digital Transformation, to learn more about this discovery process—the first of a five-step plan for creating a foolproof digital transformation strategy. Let me know what you think. We are here to help and happy to discuss.

When it Comes to Your Customer Experience: Ditch Legacy, Go Digital!

The future of business, indeed the future of customer experience, is life as we know it—here and NOW. Organizational success right now, however, depends on one thing: digital transformation.

Digital transformation can mean many things, but includes a fundamental idea—applying digital technologies to all aspects of life. For consumers, they use their smart devices, laptops, tablets, and favorite apps to make it through the day. For organizations, this means figuring out how to leverage existing digital technologies (apps, processes, procedures) and resources (essentially the talent of your employees) within your business strategically to serve consumers on their terms at any moment—all the time. And to do so better than your competition. Digital transformation also means looking at your existing business applications, mobile apps, processes, procedures, and talent through a different lens.

A successful digital transformation requires a shift in organizational behavior and cultural mindset. It means creating a strategic road map that outlines implementation and ongoing process improvement. It requires executive buy-in, sponsorship, and steady leadership. Perhaps most daunting of all, it means companies working to truly know and understand their customers. It means enterprise leaders having a firm grip on the big data that infuses their organizations.

The reality of a smart, digital world is clear. Advanced technologies like IoT and virtual reality are no longer science fiction, but fact. So much so that in just three short years, it’s expected that 100 million consumers will be shopping in virtual reality, and up to 20 billion objects will be Internet-enabled. Meanwhile, automation and data analytics have evolved from luxuries to enterprise necessities. Driven by this rapid pace of digital change, analysts predict that 65% of children today will grow up to work in roles that don’t yet exist.

Companies need to successfully digitize to remain agile, integrated and future-proof enough to support this future of everything. The good news is that 80% currently identify “digital transformation” as their top strategic priority. The bad news? These same companies are seriously struggling to migrate from their existing aged processes and legacy systems and architecture. Consider industries like government, where 71% of federal IT decision makers still use old operating systems to run important applications. How can they go digital without having the latest platforms in place to support a digital environment?

Organizations can’t re-imagine operations, re-engineer critical processes, or align key business areas the way they need to while relying on antiquated technologies. But creating a migration path is easier said than done. We have said it before and we will say it again, it’s about more than just the technology.

Sounds challenging, but it’s not impossible. Our ebook, The Fundamentals of Digital Transformation, can help organizations get started. Take a look to learn more about the top challenges of taking legacy experiences into the digital world, as well as the five key steps organizations can take to minimize disruption and boost adoption of new digital capabilities. Let me know what you think. We are here and happy to discuss.