Why Avaya is Embracing WebRTC in a Big Way

WebRTC is on the cusp of fundamentally changing the way people interact with one another on the Web. What’s remarkable is that so few consumers have ever heard of it.

In the near future, you might be shopping for clothing online when you get a prompt asking if you’d like to video chat with a fashion consultant live. Or you’re buying airline tickets when your browser crashes, erasing the transaction. When you return to that webpage, you might get a prompt inviting you to call someone in customer service through your browser.

This week, a handful of Avayans will take the stage to talk about the promise (and perils) of WebRTC, at the WebRTC Conference & Expo in Santa Clara, Calif.

WebRTC is a new online standard being developed in tandem with HTML5. Its implications are far-reaching, said Val Matula, Avaya’s Senior Director of Multimedia Technologies, and one of the speakers at this week’s conference.

“It’s going to make voice and video much more common on the Internet,” Matula said. “You might say to yourself, ‘My goodness. Almost everyone has Skype today or Facetime. How could it be more common?’ … WebRTC makes it so easy to add your website that consumers will start to see it being used in all sorts of places.”

Researchers at Avaya are busy integrating the technology into the company’s existing suite of customer experience software, notably around online interactions.

Take for example, the ways WebRTC could improve an online store.

Web transactions are great when everything works according to plan. Consumers can log on 24 hours a day, browse their options, build an order and pay without ever interacting with a representative from the company.

What happens though, when a Web transaction fails? It’s estimated that 60- to 70 percent of consumers abandon their online shopping carts–a number of whom, no doubt, had a question about a product that an employee of the company could have answered.

Offering online customer service is one way companies could improve their shopping cart abandonment rates.

Matula predicts that once WebRTC becomes commonplace, consumers will demand interactive online customer experiences. That may prove a challenge for companies that require an enterprise-grade solution.

Software developers working with WebRTC are “going to find that they can get a demo or a simple application going very well,” Matula said. “But if they dig into the details, they’re going to want security, recording, compliance, etc. We’re going to see more people asking Avaya, ‘What do you have? Because I need the other things you can provide as well. I need your whole package in order to be successful.'”

Listen to my entire conversation with Dr. Matula below, and share your thoughts about WebRTC in the comments section. How do you see WebRTC impacting the enterprise?

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Wrangling the IoT: The Next-Gen Architecture We’ve All Been Waiting For

Technologies like AI, the IoT, virtual reality and data analytics are no longer enterprise luxuries, but means of survival in an era of rapid digital disruption. They’re transforming traditional processes, redefining roles and responsibilities, and reimaging the customer/brand relationship. Consider that five years from now, more than one-third of skills needed in today’s workforce will look different because of technological advancement. Three years from now, 100 million consumers are expected to be shopping in virtual reality. Data algorithms are now being used to positively alter the behavior of workers.

These technologies are no longer the basis for science-fiction movies like “The Terminator” or “The Matrix.” They’re here and now. Today, millions of people can watch chatbots argue with each other for entertainment. People are spending days in virtual reality, essentially living in an alternate universe.

Who’s to say that far-reaching movie plots like “Her” and “I, Robot” won’t become reality 30 years from now? We can’t say for sure, however, one thing we do know is that businesses must transition from legacy, hierarchal architecture to a next-generation platform so they can flexibly respond at today’s speed of digital change.

In a recent blog, I explored five key areas of this next-generation platform that every business must consider: next-gen IT, the IoT, AI/automation, an open ecosystem, and the customer/citizens experience. I tackled the first of these five areas: next-gen IT. Now, let’s explore what businesses should know about a next-generation platform in terms of the IoT.

The Only Way to Bring Legacy into Today’s Next-Gen World of IoT

Capitalizing on the IoT is an exponential challenge when core systems and applications are still running in a legacy-dependent environment. To succeed, companies must bring legacy into today’s next-generation world of IoT—a process with its own set of unique challenges.

For starters, the IoT is a vast and loosely defined concept. Some define the IoT simply as sensorous technology. Others, the interworking of various embedded devices that can collect and exchange data. The way I see it, anything that can connect to either a network or provide any sort of service (not just data collection and exchange) should be considered part of the IoT. Because virtually anything can be considered part of the IoT, it becomes difficult to implement one single solution designed to target all IoT requirements. Because of this, we see many IoT solutions on the market today (i.e., Bluetooth, WiFi, ZigBee, LPWAN) that support a range of different requirements.

These solutions also typically don’t use IP protocols, making them impractical in today’s world of any-to-any communication. With billions of connected devices in use today, companies must migrate away from non-IP technologies towards converged architecture to begin building process workflow automation based on IoT analytics. For example, consider a utility company that can automatically notify customers of the impact of an impending weather storm based on predictive analytics from sensors deployed throughout its power lines. The provider can then increase the reliability of their services while keeping customers informed on the severity of the storm using real-time data. As you can see, breaking the silos between various “data sets” (Big Data) is the key to building workflows that are impactful to customers and/or citizens.

The end goal of the IoT is to create automated (and in many cases data-driven) processes that generate the exact business or customers/citizens outcome you’re looking for. The right technology foundation is essential for turning this goal into a practical reality.

So, what’s the answer? An open, software-enabled, meshed architecture platform. This next-generation platform makes it easy to migrate from legacy architecture to begin securely deploying IoT devices that drive higher levels of efficiency:

  • Open, SDN architecture supports unmatched levels of IoT intelligence. The platform continuously learns and changes conditions as needed via constantly updated traffic flows. Consider, for example, asset utilization reports that detail up-to-the-minute operational activity, enabling decision makers to change course as needed for continual improvement and cost savings. Meanwhile, an open-sourced ecosystem offers programmable APIs that allow companies to customize their IoT services and applications to meet their exact needs.
  • End-to-end network segmentation delivers built-in, point-to-point security for up to 168,000 devices that can run on any vendor’s network. This is achieved through three core components—hyper-segmentation, native stealth and automated elasticity—that work in unison to effectively isolate and filter traffic from IoT device to destination. End-to-end network segmentation is inherently designed to secure the IoT ecosystem, and yet only 23% of companies currently have such a solution deployed.
  • An SDN-based IoT controller seamlessly manages the integrated IoT environment. Based on a multi-protocol controller that manages all service modules within the framework, the IoT controller can assign service profiles to open networking adaptors, manage interfaces into SDN program environments, expose north and southbound APIs, and more.

The fact is this: the IoT is a reality that’s only going to substantially accelerate. Three years from now, it’s expected that companies will be spending up to $2 trillion on IoT devices. Five years from now, analysts predict that the IoT will save consumers and businesses $1 trillion per year. In this same period, though, it’s expected that more than 25% of identified enterprise attacks will involve the IoT. During this time, many businesses will continue to struggle with IoT security and management.

We’re only seeing the beginning of what can be achieved with the IoT, but these possibilities are limited without the right technology foundation. The last three decades have seen humans manually providing input to generate desired outcomes, whereas digital enterprises are now using sensors as the input mechanism, combined with sophisticated automated workflows. Scary one may say, but nonetheless our reality.

Think about it: does a self-driving car need any input from humans? Not if the vehicle knows the driver’s calendar, destination and location of people you may need to pick up. It will automatically take the preferred route to keep you on time, find the closest parking space (smart parking), and even, if required, let people know you’ve arrived. At this point, humans are simply going for the ride! This is exactly why the right IoT foundation is so critical to digital transformation. It’s imperative that businesses invest in a next-generation platform that can deliver the simplicity needed to connect, secure and manage the ever-growing number of IoT devices. At the end of the day, a meshed architecture platform represents the best—and arguably the only—way to effectively reduce IoT breaches, rapidly innovate, and improve IT staff efficiency. The possibilities of IoT are seemingly endless for businesses with this foundation.

Up next, we’ll be tackling the third key area of a next-generation platform: artificial intelligence/automation. Be sure to check back soon!

The 2020 Network Is Here: Stop Visualizing and Start Deploying

At this point, it’s safe to say you’ve heard of digital transformation and the radical changes it’s driving within the enterprise as we approach the 2020 network. For example, up to 45% of activities that employees are paid to perform can now be automated. Companies are working overtime to identify security solutions that defend against vulnerabilities found in 70% of IoT devices today. The average business now offers customers up to nine engagement channels to be used across a vast array of devices.

Organizational boundaries are blurring. The speed of change has become relentless. Networking as we know it has been redefined. All of this, of course, has significantly changed the role of IT within the modern-day enterprise.

The days of troubleshooting computers and running phone lines are dead and gone. Today, IT represents the foundation for numerous key areas of business, many that far surpass the norm. CIOs are emerging as leaders of customer-facing functions, responsible for driving digital user experiences organization-wide. Business owners are strategically using IT to accelerate their core revenue-generating activities. Half are now collecting ideas through business unit workshops facilitated by IT. Driven by digital transformation, IT has changed to the point of no return.

Digital transformation, however, is far from over. Research makes it clear we’re only getting started. Consider the vast changes expected to occur over the next three years alone. Gartner predicts that by 2020:

  • 100 million consumers will shop in virtual reality
  • 30% of web browsing sessions will be done without a screen
  • Algorithms will positively alter the behavior of billions of global workers

By 2021, 20% of all activities will involve at least one of seven digital giants like Amazon, Facebook, or Apple. By 2022, a blockchain-based business will be worth an estimated $10 billion. It’s clear the potential of trends like the IoT, cloud, big data analytics, and robotics is far from fulfilled and will only accelerate substantially as we move forward.

This all leads to one very important question: what will the network of 2020 look like? This massive, continued change will surely place unprecedented demand on IT infrastructure looking ahead.

Almost a year ago, Principal Analyst at ZK Research, Zeus Kerravala, aimed to answer this question via an article published to Network World. In it, he outlined key challenges that lie ahead for companies looking to capitalize on digital transformation (i.e., lack of automation, nodal configuration, multicast deployments), as well as what the network of 2020 will look like. Terms like simplified, mobile-centric, enhanced for contextualized customer experiences, and hyper-converged rounded out a comprehensive list of components, all which are just as valid today as they were this time last year.

Over the last year, however, Avaya has worked to streamline the 2020 network by condensing the technology into five key areas that businesses across every industry must consider: deep and wide automation, improved scalability, built-in security, mesh architecture, and an open network ecosystem.

Five Key Areas of the 2020 Network Every Business Must Know

  1. Deep and wide automation:

    As enterprises start aligning IT around their core business priorities, they must work to support two levels of automation: the first for automating the network architecture itself, and the second for automating various business workflows. The first involves eliminating complex, nodal configurations (traditionally required for service deployment) in order to easily add capacity and scaling capabilities. The second involves adopting a powerful, open workflow engine to increase productivity and overall efficiency. Network and workflow automation are essential for achieving the utmost business success.

  2. Scalability:

    Traditionally, scaling your architecture required that you replace your existing nodes with faster ones. In today’s smart, digital world, however, companies must evolve traditional scalability from legacy hierarchal architecture to fabric-based architecture. This move will enable them to add capacity at will and simulate nodal configuration, much like VMWare did with the introduction of server virtualization. The industry needs an end-to-end simplified virtualized network.

  3. Built-in security:

    The static configuration of legacy architecture will never offer the right level of network security needed today, nor will it support the future of the CX. As such, companies must work to eliminate legacy downfall when deploying next-generation architecture. This means sharpening the blurry, gray areas of network security—for example, when employees’ devices begin fading in and out of Wi-Fi when roaming in the parking lot. With more connected devices and more ways than ever to compromise them, it’s imperative that the 2020 network deliver any-to-any, end-to-end, built-in security. In other words, end-to-end network segmentation complemented by sophisticated authentication, encryption where needed, and real-time threat protection.

  4. Meshed architecture:

    The 2020 network epitomizes freedom of deployment. It means companies can move away from traditional hierarchal deployment and finally mesh their architecture. No more linearly connecting parts. No more limitations of Ethernet loops. A natively meshed architecture will empower organizations with unparalleled resiliency and scalability end to end (not just within the data center). At universities, for example, this means hyper-segmented, end-to-end connection across multiple campuses. At a bank, this kind of connectivity can be deployed between branch sites taking full advantage of cloud-based services. The user possibilities and business outcomes are seemingly endless.

  5. Open ecosystem:

    We live in a world of software-defined everything: SD-WAN SD-storage, SD-data center. The fact is that we’re rapidly and inevitably moving towards an open-sourced ecosystem. To prepare for this reality, businesses must ensure those vendors they invest in offer open APIs. This enables them to truly customize solution features and capabilities to meet their exact business needs. The 2020 network will no longer just endorse proprietary systems—but businesses need to continue to be cautious about how to take full advantage of open-source code without increasing business risks through vulnerabilities.

It’s imperative that organizations educate themselves on the 2020 network, not only visualizing it but taking the necessary steps for deployment. The future of networking is here, and it’s going to influence and shape your business. To learn more about these five key areas of the 2020 network, read IDC’s all-new Networks 2020 preparedness report, sponsored by Avaya.

Join us for the Transformational Journey: Avaya Evolutions is Now #AvayaENGAGE

For over 11 years Avaya Evolutions Mexico has been the milestone event for Mexico’s technology market, with over 3,000 visitors in each edition. This year Avaya Evolutions transforms into #AvayaENGAGE Mexico. Following Avaya Engage events in Dubai and Las Vegas, this is the third and final location on our tour, and the largest thought leadership event in Latin America. This must-attend event brings together top senior executives, industry leaders, technology innovators and key decision makers to reimagine the possibilities of Digital Transformation and Cloud.

In the past, Dr. Zedillo, Former President of Mexico; Felipe Calderon Hinojosa, former President of Mexico; Jose Fernandez, NASA’s first Mexican American Astronaut; Steve Wozniak; and Guy Kawasaki have all been a part of Avaya Evolutions.

Evolutions began in 2006 in Mexico as the annual premiere technology forum before expanding internationally in June 2010. The Evolutions tour gathered over 30,000 attendees in 15 different cities across the U.S., Central America, and South America, receiving the Internationalist’s Innovation Global Media Award in 2012. The success of these global events was made possible by the continuous commitment and support of our partners and sponsors.

When customers join us this June in Mexico City, they will be introduced to the latest concepts on smart digital economies from forward-looking organizations. At the Digital Transformation Lounge, customers can experience innovative demonstrations and view software solutions live.  

Join us to learn how the experience is everything. Gain knowledge and insights to make informed decisions to support your digital transformation journey.

We are bringing together an exciting lineup of keynote speakers at #AvayaENGAGE Mexico. We’re featuring Kevin Kennedy, Avaya CEO; Morag Lucey, Avaya CMO; and Gary E. Barnett, Avaya Senior Vice President and General Manager, Engagement Solutions. You can find us on Twitter @Avaya. Follow us in early May as we announce our very special guest speakers.

Join us in Mexico City on June 21 for a can’t-miss next-gen experience. I hope to see you there!