Six Questions to Help Non-Profit IT Managers Pick the Right Partner

Every organization knows the importance of stretching each dollar. That’s especially true of a non-profit trying to keep operating costs at a minimum. They must keep their IT system investment running at peak performance, ensuring constant communication with members and achieving the organization’s underlying goals.

According to the recent 9th Annual Non-Profit Technology Staffing and Investments Report, IT staffs at national non-profits are falling into four categories:

  • Struggling:

    “We are struggling; we have a failing infrastructure, and our technology time and budget generally go towards creating workarounds, repairing old equipment, and duplicating tasks.”

  • Functioning:

    “We keep the lights on; we have basic systems in place to meet immediate needs. Leadership makes technology decisions based on efficiencies, with little to no input from staff/consultant.”

  • Operating:

    “We keep up; we have stable infrastructure and a set of technology policies and practices. Leadership makes technology decisions based on standard levels according to industry/sector information and gathers input from technology staff/consultant before making a final decision.”

  • Leading:

    “We’re innovators; we recognize that technology is an investment in our mission, and leadership integrates technology decisions with organizational strategy. Technology-responsible staff is involved in overall strategic planning.”

More than half of the surveyed organizations reported that they were at “Operating” level when it comes to technology adoption. The report also found that “Leading” organizations are nearly twice more likely to include technology in their strategic plans than” Struggling” organizations.

Large Charity’s Challenge: Support 100+ Sites with Lean IT Team

Recently, one of the leading organizations, with 125 locations in the U.S. and an array of business communications solutions, faced their own three challenges:

  • Small IT staff overseeing large number of locations
  • Support required for multivendor environment
  • Insufficient tools to troubleshoot end user business communications problems

“I run an extremely lean staff,” says the telecom manager at one of the US’s top 25 non-profit organizations. “We do 25-50 major projects a year. Opening new locations, upgrading existing locations—all on top of day-to-day business. For us, it’s imperative that we operate as efficiently as possible with the tight resources we have.”

To overcome these challenges while boosting stability and allowing IT to focus on high value projects, the IT Manager looked for answers to six critical questions for a potential support services partner and their systems:

  1. Does the partner have the experience and resources to keep systems up and running while allowing the team to focus on high priority projects?

  2. Does the partner have the skills necessary to work in a collaborative multivendor environment?

  3. How does the partner optimize the performance of the current business environment while proactively preventing problems before they become outages? Do they use self-healing automated intelligent systems or is it manual?

  4. Does the partner have a continuum of services to support an evolving environment from maintenance to proactive support to managed to private cloud?

  5. How quickly can the provider restore systems during a disaster or emergency scenario?

  6. Can the partner provide an easy-to-use tool that helps diagnose reported intermittent network issues?


What are some of the questions that you are asking partners?


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As Consumer Tech Remakes the Workplace, a Thoughtful Security Strategy Is the Best Defense

I think we’d all agree the business landscape has changed dramatically over the past two decades. Think back to the last time you wrote a paper memo or sent a card inviting a colleague to a meeting. It’s been a long while.

For the most part, we’ve enthusiastically embraced this technology revolution in business, but recently it’s evolved to a point where consumer technology is now reshaping the workplace. In this blog series, we’ll discuss this phenomenon, how it’s made us more vulnerable to cyber-attacks and what measures and solutions we can employ to protect against security breaches.

Think about it. We carry multiple devices to stay connected both professionally and personally. These devices have become our modern day Filofaxes or Franklin Planners. So much so, that we’ve blurred the lines between these two worlds—once separate and distinct. We have one calendar, one set of contacts, one laptop and, for many of us, our social networks are a mix of work and play.

So when we hear about the latest cyber-attack or hack, the question we always ask ourselves is, “Can I be affected?”

The fact is our growing dependence on consumer technology puts our companies and us at higher risk to become victims. We become more vulnerable with every new tech toy, gadget or app we place at our fingertips … and we’re not talking just smartphones. Look at Smart TV (connected to the Internet), home automation devices (e.g., Nest or Hues), even the cars we drive. Everything is becoming connected, delivering real-time information to our smart devices, whenever and wherever we are.

Our demands have also extended to where we use these smart devices. We want connectivity in Starbucks, a shopping mall, a sports stadium … we want to remain in touch, irrespective of location. This presents a challenge for many, but especially for our CIOs who not only have to secure corporate information but also weigh potential exposure as a result of our hyper-connected world.

Also consider the increasing number of employees working from remote locations … the CIO, who once had total visibility of what we’re doing and using during business hours, now has only a glimpse of what’s deployed in our homes or coffee shops. And let’s not forget collaboration tools and apps that allow for real-time connectivity and electronic file sharing between anyone with internet access, from anywhere and from any device. While these capabilities have enabled us to work smarter and more efficiently, with those benefits comes the increased risk of enterprise security issues and data breaches.

For most organizations, it’s not a question of if a security breach is going to occur, it’s when will it occur. And when a company is attacked, so too are the people affiliated with it (think customers, employees, vendors and partners).

Perhaps we need to consider how hackers go about their work to understand why the decisions we make (or don’t make) today could have immediate and devastating consequences.

For starters, hackers look to identify a point of entry that will allow them to establish a command and control base. Remember if it has a processor, memory and connectivity, it’s a target. All the examples I cited above fall into this criteria.

Once they’ve established a control point, they explore their surroundings. Imagine for a moment a hacker gaining access to your home automation, then having the ability to eavesdrop on all your communications: banking services, business services, media content … potentially watching your every move. Now all your personal and business activities are compromised. It’s a frightening thought, right? But it’s one that can be proactively addressed.

There are two common methodologies for eliminating or greatly minimizing security breaches. The easiest is to say “No, you can’t do that” (seldom effective). We recommend a more thoughtful, practical, and deliberate approach that involves both active and passive security measures.

The Avaya approach is complementary to your existing security measures, not a rip and replace approach but one that supports your business operations. Whilst other solutions will address vulnerabilities on the devices, or only allow certain traffic to pass a specific point in the network, Avaya adds to your security posture by eliminating the ability of the hacker to move around your network at will. This is commonly referred to as lateral movement, and with the use of Avaya SDN Fx hyper-segmentation capability, we’re able to prevent this exploration. We have more than 16 million service identifiers to use—it’s like trying to find a needle in a haystack.

If you can’t see it, then you can’t hack it! Avaya also has the ability to run these services in stealth mode, the ability to convey these services in a manner that is quiet and careful in order not to be seen or heard.

This provides you with security that’s based upon the services you support on your network, not focused on the routes that traffic may pass through. This dynamic approach to security is elastic in nature: as the demands for your network change, the ability to expand and contract these services follows the natural rhythm of your network. (Avaya Chief Technologist for SDA Jean Turgeon wrote a three-part blog series exploring these three core pillars. Read about hyper-segmentation, native stealth and automatic elasticity.)

In addition to this, we expand our capability to the edge of the work, the access layer. Here through the use of standards-based approaches, we’ll examine not only the device coming onto the network, the credentials it’s presenting, its location, but we’ll also examine its behavior on the network—its digital fingerprint.

Through years of experience in real-time apps, we’ve been able to capture, identify, quantify and then react to a whole range of activities. The same is also true for the emerging world of the IoT (Internet of Things) and the explosion in connected devices. Through the innovative use of Avaya Breeze™, we’re able to blend the worlds of infrastructure and apps, keeping a watchful eye on everything that passes through the network, and when something does catch our eye, having the ability to react, in real-time, to circumvent that anomaly.

The Avaya capability plugs the gaps that so many hackers exploit, and through our use of innovative technologies, we allow the network infrastructure to support the business in a dynamic, elastic, and secure manner, giving business the agility to use what it needs, when it wants to, and where it wants to use it.

IP Office Leads the Way: How Doubling Down in One Product Area Can Drive Best Practices

Just over a month ago, we released the latest version of Avaya IP Office, one of the most popular SMB/MM UC systems on the market today. Over the past year, we’ve doubled the number of partners who are offering IP Office as a cloud deployment and have now shipped more than half a million systems globally—but this kind of success didn’t come overnight.

We’ve evolved Avaya IP Office a long way over the years, growing the product from something geared towards the SMB space (typically 100 users and below) to something that can scale all the way up to the midmarket, serving up to 3,000 users. Adding this scale to the product was extremely important because as our customers and partners grow, we can now grow right along with them. It also opens up the potential market served by the product.

Evolving with Our Customers and Partners

At Avaya, we have two groups of people to keep happy—our end users and our channel partners—and both want to make long-term investments in a communications solution and trusted business partner. That’s why, instead of concentrating on multiple product lines, we’re focused on continually enhancing Avaya IP Office with new features and capabilities, such as the new release 10, which adds a number benefits for businesses in terms of security, resiliency and end-user experience.

Our partners are happy with this approach because their salespeople now only need to know one single product, making it easier to sell, manage and configure the technology for a wide range of businesses (anywhere from a 10-person to 3,000-person company). And our customers are thrilled because as they expand and evolve, they have a flexible, scalable communications solution that can still meet their every need.

Businesses can even expand the solution into a simple and robust multi-channel call center. With IP Office Contact Center or Avaya Contact Center Select, companies can integrate voice, e-mail, and web chat channels, and proactively manage the entire customer interaction lifecycle. They can start at their own pace with one channel such as voice, for example, and add other channels such as e-mail as business objectives evolve. In June, Avaya also announced a highly affordable, simple-to-deploy workforce optimization solution that enables a wide range of insights into the customer experience, allowing midsize businesses to create the most value through every customer interaction.

Providing Investment Protection

While many businesses are aware of cloud, not everyone wants it right now. Because Avaya IP Office is offered as a cloud, hybrid cloud, or premises based deployment, businesses can move to the cloud at a more measured pace—adding new features and capabilities from the cloud as they become available or needed, and leveraging the investment they have in a premises deployment.

For instance, a business could start with an IP Office solution today on premises, and then migrate to cloud or hybrid cloud in a year or even five years from now—and all the features and training they’ve given to employees will stay exactly the same because the end-user experience will be the same.

Providing further investment protection, Avaya even allows customers running on old Nortel technology to seamlessly move their user licenses to IP Office at minimal cost.

A Relentless Focus on Quality

Doubling down in one product area has also allowed Avaya to put a premium on quality. Today, Avaya’s Net Promoter Score (NPS)—a measure of the willingness of a customer to recommend a company’s products or services to others—hovers around 58, which is considered excellent in almost any industry. The Net Promoter Score for IP Office has been over 70 for the last several quarters.

This sky-high NPS is all the more impressive when you consider Avaya IP Office is for small 10-user customers and larger 3,000-user customers. This ability to meet high- and low-end needs is pretty unique in the industry, and is only achievable because of the company’s relentless focus on quality and features.

Always striving to understand the needs of our customers, we’re constantly adding new enhancements to IP Office. Leveraging much of the knowledge and experience we learned at the enterprise-level with Avaya Aura, we continue to add usability and resiliency to IP Office. In fact, the latest version of the platform features built-in signaling and media encryption for endpoints and UC clients, helping preserve privacy and data integrity. This increase in security is especially significant to the midmarket, where the number of attacks reported by midsize companies increased 64% between 2013 and 2014, according to the 2015 global survey report.

Beyond other pure cloud deployments, the latest version of IP Office also takes a unique approach to resilience, providing system failover cloud to cloud, cloud to premises, premises to cloud, and premises to premises, keeping your system active and users connected through any outage.

Moving forward, we’ll continue to add enhancements to Avaya IP Office, relentlessly driving quality and features for our growing list of customers and partners.

Heads in the Cloud: Digital Natives and Unified Communications

Millennial—a four-syllable word that may as well be a four-letter one. Millennials are polarizing, and everyone seems to have an opinion about Gen Y, especially when it comes to the workplace.

For many 20- and 30-somethings in the workforce, an unfortunate reality is a stigma around their generation—a disdain for their unwillingness to cope with the status quo of conventional workplace policies. But with that comes the realization that the guard has changed, and they now make up a majority of the workforce, driving the future of their chosen industries.

Young workers are driving a paradigm shift in the working world, putting a greater emphasis on work-life balance and striving for career advancement, with an unprecedented willingness to jump ship from a current position to find something that better suits their needs and goals. Companies need to be able to court and retain the best of the digital native generation, making adjustments to suit the employees of the future.

As a proud member of Gen Y, I can say that the technology and services available in the workplace are some of the most important factors to me, and I’m not alone. I’m part of a contingent of employees that have more than just our heads in the cloud and having access to our work anywhere and everywhere is vital. In a survey conducted by, 84% of Gen Y-ers polled said they would prefer to work remotely full time. While that may not be realistic in every situation, there’s no doubt that the workplace is becoming more mobile, and productivity is not limited to a desk in an office building. Cloud-enabled unified communications and collaboration tools are the new wave, and something that Avaya excels at.

It’s for this reason that I’m happy—even proud—to work for Avaya. They see the way technology in the workplace is moving, and continue to make it easier for companies to go through digital transformations, moving smoothly into the future. And I, like many Avayans, can speak to the quality of our products and solutions first hand.

I use Avaya solutions just about every day of my life to collaborate and get my work done, from wherever and whenever I need to. I’m still amazed at how fluidly and effortlessly I can communicate with colleagues from around the world, from any device. While it’s nice to disconnect from the working world temporarily, it’s also immensely comforting to know that through Avaya technology, I can be face to face with anyone I need to talk to in a matter of minutes.

Effective communication is important in our mobile world. My generation of digital natives comes predisposed to being connected with one another effortlessly and near constantly. Having the right unified communications technology in place to facilitate fully formed and engaging collaboration experiences is vital, and something that Avaya can do for a business of any size in any industry.

This generation of employees does not want work to be easy; rather we want it to be easier to get work done. Having technology in place that allows people to maintain flexibility in their lives while still producing quality work is a necessary step for any business that wants to retain young talent and maximize results.