Digital Transformation Begins and Ends with the Customer

Being a consumer today can be frustrating. We are armed with uber powerful, smart devices that encourage multitasking from anywhere there is a connection. But the one obstacle continues to be the companies, small and large, we want to do business with via these devices. For the most part, these companies are not yet as smart as our smart, handheld devices.

It almost feels like being the first fax machine owner. It must have been a terrific feeling, but who could you talk to?

Is the gap between consumers’ smart devices and the digitization of the companies we want to do business with ever going shrink? Or will the consumer’s device always be smarter?

Smart devices have been around for a long time. In 2016 we would not consider ourselves early adopters. However, when comparing smart device adoption to corporation’s adoption of digital engagement technology, many corporation’s global infrastructures are still not as smart as our handheld devices. Case in point, last year Dimension Data reported that two out of five companies say that their current digital channel systems don’t meet current needs and less than half of those companies believe their digital infrastructure will deliver against future needs. With smart phone subscriptions expected to surpass basic phone subscriptions this year, companies are clearly struggling—and already predicting that they will continue to struggle—to keep up with their customers’ digital needs and expectations, starting with true mobility.

Think about that: the consumer experience is ahead of what most companies’ IT can deliver today and your smart device can do things for you that a global IT infrastructure, with all it scale and cost, can’t. It’s a very strange reality.

The reality for these companies is that investments in upgrading and modernizing to digitize an entire infrastructure takes budget, time, planning, and most important, commitment. Yet, not digitizing fast enough can be detrimental to the bottom line if your customers, partners, suppliers can’t interact with you as easily as they can your competitors.

Where to Start a Digital Transformation

After a company has determined that digitizing their infrastructure is an urgent matter and can no longer wait, the next challenge is planning where to start—all the while, your customers are continuing to get smarter devices. Every function, from human resources to procurement to sales to marketing, will benefit. But the truth is that the need to modernize the infrastructure originated with the customer. So doesn’t it make sense that the modernization starts where the customer interacts most—the customer experience center?

I willfully admit that may be an obvious answer coming from the CTO of Avaya. But as a customer myself, I want to do business with companies that prioritize me as a customer, and invest accordingly. I don’t want to read in the press how great their IT is if I cannot get my questions answered or my requests fulfilled and have a poor or lukewarm customer experience.

This goes back to the basics of business success. The basics that are often overlooked in the fast paced, digital world we live in: the customer is always right. The customer is the priority. The customer is why we’re in business. Treat customers as you would want to be treated. Customer. Customer. Customer. You can’t go wrong putting the customer first. User experience is king.

Unfortunately many companies who have, or are undertaking a digital transformation in order to survive, have forgotten that it’s the customer’s experience that is most important, not the company’s experience. Sure the company benefits from a digital transformation—the CAPEX and OPEX benefits are many. Employees will be more efficient, productivity will be up, performance will be easier to assess and modify. But the focus must still be about how the transition will affect the customer’s experience with the company from beginning to end.

Furthermore, the practice of contact center technology management has enabled teams to perfect how to evolve the services associated with the voice channel. Voice is often considered the most complex, technologically challenging channel—voice quality matters, and issues are immediately perceptible. As an industry, we have spent years studying and understanding how to improve upon the quality and delivery of voice to the customer experience. This same ongoing attention to detail, planning and understanding of quality needs to be applied to every additional touch point made available to the customer to connect with you. This is the humanization of going digital.

A Case for Retailers

Take traditional retailers for example. Any traditional retailer that started out as brick and mortar then needed to evolve to online sales in order to survive is compared to the king of online, digital retail: Amazon. One thing Amazon knows is that being a digital retailer is not just about putting products and services online and making them available for purchase. The real value is in defining the actual customer experience of the online shopper, and increasingly the online mobile shopper.

  • Is the online, mobile experience the same experience customers have when they visit a store or better?
  • Is the process for returning an online purchase the same experience as returning at the store or better?
  • If there is a problem with the product after it’s been purchased, is the online, voice, video, chat, omnichannel customer service experience the same as in store or better?
  • Is the customer punished for purchasing online by having to pay added shipping fees?

Notice that none of these questions ask: is the company’s experience the same or better?

This is why starting a digital transformation with the customer experience center, aka the contact center, is the logical starting point. The contact center will never be pure digital because customers expect some human interaction at some point. Add to that, that more often than not, employees—subject matter experts—outside the contact center are more actively involved with customer experience. As a result, every scenario or use case for human interaction needs to be considered and planned for during a digital transformation. Maybe the human interaction is not during the shopping process or the purchasing process. But having the ability—the option—to connect with another human being when questions or doubts arise before, during, or after the purchase is a key part of any customer journey. It builds loyalty and a long-term digital relationship with the customer.

Hidden Benefit of Customer-focused Starting Point

A hidden benefit of starting with the customer experience is that you already have people excited and ready to help you through the transition. I’m not talking about your vendor—obviously they will be there with a plan in place to partner with you through every step—if not, then you have the wrong vendor. I’m talking about your contact center agents.

Many companies when they start this transition have learned that their agents, as customers themselves and in their personal lives, are very comfortable working on multiple channels in addition to talking on the phone. In fact, the learning curve for the agents is often not as time intensive as originally anticipated. They’re excited to be able to engage with customers on any channel and create an integrated, omnichannel experience. More importantly, they understand the benefits of being able to see the customer’s entire experience history with the company—from in-store, to online, to social, to experience with products and services, etc.

That said, for social channels, more than half of companies will typically have a dedicated social response team in place to respond to customers on social channels. But having access to the customer’s history of interactions with the company across all channels, including social, is a relief to any customer interaction agent—contact center or in store. One of the top complaints by agents is not having a complete view into all of the customer’s interactions with the company. No one likes to feel stupid when trying to calm down and possibly save an unhappy customer. Having a complete view of the customer across all channels including an historical view should be a priority. Yet 79% of companies still don’t have this view today.

Many companies will say that the delay in providing their agents with a complete customer journey view is because they are still trying to leverage legacy investments through their digital transformation. Managing a digital transformation of the customer experience center by keeping legacy investments in place, while completely understandable, is not without risk. With more than 2.6 billion global users of smart phones, the risk in delaying a full digital transition is quickly losing business to competitors who are digitizing their entire infrastructure without looking back.

Once the decision to go digital is made and communicated, going digital starting with the customer experience is exciting. It means being able to be more efficient, which makes people more productive. The ability to have each customer’s historical record of interactions across all channels readily available means the agents are better informed about each customer, which allows the agents to do a better job with each customer. It also provides a single location for analytics to work its magic—but analytics is important enough on its own to be the focus of a separate blog at a later date. This is where and how customer loyalty and customer satisfaction start to go up.

It is clear to me that the level of excitement is directly correlated to the fact that your agents/employees are also customers themselves. They are smart device users. They know from experience how painful it is to try to interact with a company that is not yet digitally transformed.

And we’ve come full circle. The customer—more than 2.6 billion smart device users—is the real focus of a digital transition. On behalf of customers everywhere, please don’t forget that.

 

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2017 Avaya Customer Innovation Awards Honor Five Companies Leading the Way in Digital Transformation

Every year, Avaya and IAUG recognize a handful of customers who are innovators. These customers are recognized with Customer Innovation Awards. Last year’s award winners included a number of technology firms. This year’s five award winners, recognized on stage at Avaya Engage in Las Vegas, include three customers in the financial services sector, a leading global retailer, and a leader in the film production industry.

Each of these customers is benefiting from the latest Avaya solutions to meet business goals—whether the goals are growth, customer experience, cost management, or risk mitigation.

BECU

BECU, which began life 80 years ago as the Boeing Employee Credit Union, today is the fourth largest credit union in the US, with over $12 billion in assets and over a million credit union members. In 2016, BECU embarked on a digital transformation journey focused on the customer experience. BECU relies on Avaya Elite Multichannel running on an Avaya Pod Fx™ infrastructure.

BECU engineer Rick Webb says, “BECU is rapidly expanding and needed a technology partner that could support that expansion and keep our members happy. The Avaya Elite Multichannel infrastructure does just that, while providing increased flexibility and allowing BECU to better meet the expectations of our more than 1 million members.”

Green Shield Canada (GSC)

Green Shield Canada (GSC) is a one of the leading health and dental benefit carriers in Canada, with over 850 employees across seven locations. Starting last year, GSC is deploying the Avaya Equinox™ Experience and seeing strong results. Competing with larger players in its industry, GSC sees strong collaboration among its workforce as a key ingredient for success.

Jim Mastronardi, GSC Director for Enterprise Infrastructure says, “Green Shield Canada has over 850 employees across seven offices in Canada—from Montreal to Vancouver. We saw an opportunity to explore technology upgrades that would enhance company-wide communications and bring our teams across Canada closer together. With just a single training session, employees have hit the ground running with the Avaya Equinox tools. The video conferencing option has provided a solution to overbooked meeting rooms, and the instant messaging feature is already cutting down on the number of emails being sent.”

Scotiabank

Scotiabank prides itself on “being a technology company providing financial services.” As a long-time Avaya customer—and a beta customer for Avaya Oceana™ and Avaya Oceanalytics™—Scotiabank is on a digital transformation journey to better serve bank customers worldwide. Scotiabank contact centers located in Canada and the Caribbean & Latin America region have benefited from a next-gen centralized architecture leveraging the latest Avaya solutions to better serve customers.

Scotiabank has already developed and deployed Avaya Oceana and Avaya Breeze™ apps, and continues to innovate in an ongoing drive to improve customer service and meet customer needs in a competitive market. The success of Scotiabank’s transformation program has enabled the bank to move with greater agility, improved reliability, and speed to market. This has changed the framework for deployment from months/years to days/weeks while improving the overall ROI/TCO.

The Crossing Studios

The Crossing Studios is one of Vancouver’s largest and fastest growing full-service studios and production facilities for film. The firm caters to companies like Fox, Nickelodeon, Showtime, and Netflix. The Crossing Studios were unhappy with the stability and quality of the disparate systems previously in place across their seven studio locations. In 2016, The Crossing Studios deployed a Powered by Avaya IP Office solution offered by local provider Unity Connected Solutions.

Powered by Avaya IP Office has improved stability, reduced TCO and provided the advanced features that the business needs to serve a very demanding film industry client base, including high scale audio conferencing, extensive web collaboration, and rich multi-vendor HD video conferencing. CTO Mark Herrman says, “We needed something that would support our rapid growth, support our clients, and support our bottom line. Thanks to IP Office and the hosted cloud model, we’re able to keep pace with dynamic, fast-moving film productions, staying as flexible as our clients need us to be.” Estimated savings are in the six figures for the first year alone.

Walgreens

Walgreens is using custom Avaya Snap-ins to bring centralized contact center reporting capabilities to local branch sites, for compliance purposes and to help improve the overall customer experience. Avaya Professional Services were instrumental with the deployment, which relies on an Avaya Pod Fx infrastructure.

These companies are each leaders in their respective industries. As part of their digital transformation journeys, they recognize that when it comes to selecting a trusted technology advisor, “experience is everything.” #ExperienceAvaya.

APTs Part 4: How Do You Detect an Advanced Persistent Threat in Your Network?

Here in part four of my APT series, we’re looking at how to detect Advanced Persistent Threats in your network. The key is to know what to look for and how to spot it.

Look for patterns of behavior that are unusual from a historical standpoint. Some things to look for are unusual patterns of session activity. Port scanning and the use of discovery methods should be monitored as well. Look for unusual TCP connections, particularly lateral or outbound encrypted connections.

Remember that there is a theory to all types of intrusion. An attacker needs to compromise the perimeter. Unless the attacker is very lucky, they will not be where they need or want to be. This means that a series of lateral and northbound moves will be required to establish a foothold. In order for any information to leave your organization there has to be an outbound exfiltration channel. This is another area where APTs have to diverge from the normal behavior of a user.

Here’s what to look for:

  • Logon Activity:

    Logons to new or unusual systems can be a flag. New or unusual session types are also a flag to watch for, particularly outbound encrypted sessions or unusual time of day or location. Watch for jumps in activity or velocity.

  • Program execution:

    Look for new or unusual program executions at unusual times of the day or from unusual locations. Execution of the program from a privileged account status rather than a normal user account should also be alarming.

  • File access:

    Look for unusually high volume access to file servers or unusual file access patterns. Also be sure to monitor cloud-based sharing uploads as these are a very good way to hide in the flurry of other activity.

  • Network activity:

    New IP addresses or secondary addresses can be a flag. Unusual DNS queries should be looked into, particularly those with a bad or no reputation. Look for the correlation between the above points and new or unusual network connection activity. Many C2 channels are established in this fashion.

  • Database access:

    Most users do not have access to the database directly. But also look for manipulated applications calls doing sensitive table access, modifications or deletions. Be sure to lock down the database environment by disabling many of the added options that most modern databases provide. An application proxy service should be implemented to prevent direct access in a general fashion.

     

    The goal is to arrive at a risk score based on the aggregate of the above. This involves the session serialization of hosts as they access resources. The problem with us as humans is this: if we’re barraged with tons of data and forced to do the picking out of significant data, we are woefully inefficient. First of all, we have a propensity for missing certain data sets. How often have you heard the saying, “Another set of eyes”? Never manually analyze data alone, always have another set of eyes go over it.

     

    At Avaya we’ve developed a shortest path bridging networking fabric we refer to as SDN Fx™ Architecture that is based on three basic self-complimentary security principles:

    • Hyper-segmentation: This is a new term that we’ve coined to indicate the primary deltas of this new approach to traditional network micro-segmentation. First, hyper-segments are extremely dynamic and lend themselves well to automation and dynamic service chaining, as is often required with software-defined networks. Second, they are not based on IP routing and therefore do not require traditional route policies or access control lists to constrict access to the micro-segment. These two traits create a service that is well suited for security automation.
    • Stealth: Due to the fact that SDN Fx is not based on IP, it is dark from an IP discovery perspective. Many of the topological aspects to the network, which are of key importance to APTs, simply cannot be discovered by traditional port scanning and discovery techniques. So the hyper-segment holds the user or intruder in a narrow and dark community that has little or no communications capability with the outside world, except through well-defined security analytic inspection points.
    • Elasticity: Because we are not dependent on IP routing to establish service paths, we can extend or retract certain secure hyper-segments based on authentication and proper authorization. Just as easily however, SDN FX can retract a hyper-segment, perhaps based on an alert from security analytics that something is amiss with the suspect system. There may even be the desire to redirect them into Honey pot environments where a whole network can be replicated in SDN Fx for little or no cost from a networking perspective.

In the End

Hardly a day goes by without hearing about a data breach somewhere in the world. To combat these breaches, it’s imperative to understand how APTs work and how you can detect them. Remember—prevention is ideal, but detection is a must!

With this blog series, I hope I’ve helped you see how to limit the impact of APTs on your enterprise. If you missed a blog post, here’s the whole series:

APTs Part 1: Protection Against Advanced Persistent Threats to Your Data

APTs Part 2: How the Advanced Persistent Threat Works

APTs Part 3: Prevention is Ideal, But Detection is a Must

APTs Part 4: How Do You Detect an Advanced Persistent Threat in Your Network?

Avaya and Axis Communications: Securing Video Surveillance Solutions

What do video surveillance cameras, badge readers, video conferencing endpoints and IP phones have in common? They all utilize the IP network infrastructure.

Technologies that have been traditionally segregated are converging on a common secure fabric infrastructure. A good example of this is in the physical security and video surveillance space. Traditionally video surveillance solutions were analog and ran over physically segregated networks with no integration to a company’s corporate IP network and communication systems. Today’s video surveillance solutions are vastly different. Most cameras are now IP based, with video surveillance traffic running over a converged IP network alongside other corporate applications such as unified communications, video conferencing, and traditional data networking. Additionally, newer surveillance cameras are SIP enabled, thus enabling them to integrate into the corporate communication systems.

This week at Avaya Engage 2017 in Las Vegas, Avaya, in conjunction with Axis Communications, is highlighting the innovation that has integrated physical security and IP communications. Avaya and Axis Communications are showcasing two unique capabilities:

  • Smart Security:

    The integration between Axis Communications intrusion and visitor access control offerings and Avaya Engagement solutions enable business to integrate physical security with their business processes. For example, if a visitor arrives at a location and presses the button on the Axis door station, the Avaya UC solution leverages call routing intelligence to place the call to the appropriate staff. The staff member then has the option to remotely open the door or talk to the visitor before deciding whether to let them in. To learn more, visit https://www.devconnectmarketplace.com/axis-communications

  • Automated Security:

    Avaya’s Automatic Elasticity capability offers automated network attach for Axis surveillance cameras to Avaya’s secure Fabric. The large Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack on Dyn last October, which temporarily brought down Twitter, Spotify and other sites, put the spotlight on cybersecurity in surveillance. While attacks are not new (I blogged about this topic previously in Who’s Securing Your Security Solution?), the significance of the Dyn attack clearly illustrates the potential threat that Internet of Things devices pose, if not connected securely.

    Avaya’s Automatic Elasticity capability allows for fast, secure onboarding of Axis video surveillance cameras. This capability automatically and securely provisions the virtual network and Quality of Service parameters for network endpoints such as video surveillance cameras. Once the endpoint device is removed from the network, Avaya’s secure Automatic Elasticity solution removes the virtual network, thus eliminating vulnerable backdoor entry points into the network. To learn more, read the Scalable, Always-on Video Surveillance with Avaya Fabric Connect and the Avaya Securing the Everywhere Perimeter fact sheets.

If you’re at Avaya Engage, stop by the Axis booth #304 to see our solutions in action.