Mobility: Enterprise Roamer Solutions

An Enterprise Roamer is individual working in and around an enterprise facility while not at an assigned desk.

This may include people moving from a desk to a conference room, a nurse, doctor, hotel or retail associate who does not use a desk, or a knowledge worker who uses “hoteling” to occupy a temporary office, workspace, or cubicle.

As noted in a previous blog, (See Mobility: It’s More Than Just Apps!) Enterprise Roamers are just one use case for mobility.

The objective of Enterprise Roamer solutions is to allow someone to shift easily between devices and networks and remain available while in motion or while borrowing a temporary space within an enterprise facility. It is also intended to reduce cell phone expenses by shifting traffic from the cellular network to the corporate WiFi network.

  • An enterprise roamer sometimes shifts between use case scenarios, such as moving from road warrior mode to enterprise roaming mode, or from roaming mode to desk worker mode. To facilitate these transitions, Avaya Communicator for iPhone and Android support dual mode and allow the user to transition a call from cellular to WiFi in either direction. Likewise, when arriving at or leaving the desk, the user can shift a call between the desk phone or PC and the mobile device. EC500 has a feature on the desk phone that allows a user to shift a call in either direction. To simplify things further, Avaya SIP users can have up to 10 devices simultaneously registered to their extension and need only pick up an active line appearance on another device and disconnect from the original to shift between devices.
  • While in the enterprise facility, the enterprise roamer can use Avaya Communicator on an iPad, iPhone or Android device over Wi-Fi for voice, video and UC. While outside the enterprise, the user comes in via the Avaya Session Border Controller (SBC) for Enterprise. Inside the enterprise, the user connects directly. The method used to establish the connection is determined automatically. From a user perspective, there is no difference. The Avaya WLAN 9100 Roaming Assist feature helps clients roam to access points that provide a high-quality connection, eliminating the ‘sticky client’ problem.
  • Avaya Identity Engines lets users and guests self-register devices to the wireless and wired networks. Policy-based service gives users appropriate access, bandwidth and priority based on user, user class, device, location and application.
  • Avaya Aura hoteling features allow a user to log into an IP phone anywhere on the network (even at another location) and receive access to their extension and associated features. This provides sales people with access while they are using a shared desk and traveling executives with service while they are visiting a given location.
  • Avaya’s phone portfolio includes wireless IP and DECT wireless phones. These purpose-built, in-building wireless devices can be used on their own (e.g. in a retail environment) or twinned with the enterprise extension (e.g. in an office environment).
  • Avaya Communicator for iPhone also works on the iPod Touch. This is ideal for users who are mobile throughout the enterprise location but who don’t need a monthly cellular plan. This is a less costly approach to providing such users with access to VoIP and UC capabilities for use within Wi-Fi range.
  • Call control for enterprise roamers allows users to determine if and when calls are directed to their smartphone. When a user joins a meeting in a conference room, they would typically turn off their device or shift it to silent mode, which is often not that silent. Avaya users have the option of directing most calls to voicemail, while still allowing VIP calls to come through directly to their device.
  • For contact center supervisors, Avaya’s Call Management System (CMS) Mobile Supervisor allows supervisors and managers to monitor call volumes, queues and agent skills while moving about the contact center to ensure service levels are being met.