Four Reasons Your Social Customer Care Belongs in the Contact Center

I have had the great opportunity for much of the last 4 years to speak with CMOs and social media Managers of companies across the globe about their social customer service needs and strategies. During this time I have also seen how social media has gone through many changes.

  • Facebook added business pages and not just profiles
  • Twitter accounts specifically for customer support
  • Video is embedded everywhere: from YouTube, Vimeo to Vine; and is also aimed at helping customers to answer their questions

While companies have been focused primarily on engaging their followers with creative content, enticing them to consume more of their products and services, many have also learned that servicing customers on social media is desirable, and sometimes mandatory, as well as efficient. In many organizations the resources responsible for creating content are challenged by the quantity and breadth of the customer questions. This post highlights 4 reasons why you should take a closer look at your social customer care strategy and determine whether your contact center is the better place to handle it.

Servicing the customer is the bread and butter of the contact center, so why aren’t more contact centers handling social media?

You likely know well what your contact center excels at today. Very likely the following reasons will look obvious as they represent the advantages a contact center typically offers. It is not always that easy. Almost every session I have held with our customers has the employees (of the same company) introducing themselves to each other since they come from different areas of the business, often having never met and came to the meeting having received a “social media discussion” meeting request. Any social customer service discussion requires representatives from the contact center, IT as well as marketing. Without early partnering the chances of a successful approach is limited. Take the following points into your business to help drive your social customer care conversation.

Scalability

Forecasting social media, the number of incoming tweets, posts or comments, is tricky. This is a popular question I get from seasoned scheduling gurus and the answer is not yet science. Unlike the telephone or email channels, social media sees many more customers (and non-customers) take to Twitter or a company’s Facebook page to comment on something they saw in the news or experienced during the day. This can mean that what a company sees during a ‘typical day’ of 80-300 incoming tweets might change to 4000 the next. (Yes, these are true numbers reported.) Your contact center, its queuing technologies and algorithms were designed just for this. Agent pools are designed to adapt to changing conditions. Just employ what you have and understand how to best care for this challenging arena.

Repeatability

Consistent processes determine the success of any contact center operation. Today, most social media Managers use a collection of tools during any given day. These can be free and simple or premium versions with more capabilities. Their managing of social media engagement is only part of their workload. Their response to customers’ queries is more organic and grows though their own experience. The results are ad-hoc and hard to scale much less improve upon. Contact centers continually analyze and improve their processes. Contact centers have the fundamental tools to take social media into their processes and build consistent customer experiences.

Manageability

There is a saying I learned when I first came into designing contact centers: “if you can’t measure it, don’t build it”. The number of likes, shares or click-thru’ s, while important for brand recognition and marketing program success, doesn’t say much about how easy it is for a customer to do business with you. Contact centers have taken this on as a key set of metrics including NPS (Net Promoter Score), FCR (First Contact Resolution), Customer Effort. They measure not the macro level metadata but every interaction and this allows you to constantly improve your processes as well as your customer’s experiences. Applying the same level of analysis to social customer care as you do to other interaction channels will allow you to improve the overall perception of your company.

Auditability

Social media is a public conversation. We have all seen the news. A meaningful social media Manager posts the wrong comment at the wrong time. It happens. You might be missing the right systems to prevent the wrong message from going public. Integrating social media with your contact center will not give you 100% protection. It does bring features that allow auditing of the events and may uncover others which don’t make the news, though equally effect your customers’ satisfaction. By bringing social media interactions into the contact center, every interaction can be recorded, monitored and reviewed. This is your insurance policy. This is where most other social media tools fall short. Auditing social media exchanges as you do other interactions provide lessons, insights and puts you in control, allowing your business to participate in the public conversation with confidence.

Taking control of your company’s social customer care efforts will enable you to overtake your competition, reduce costs and increase customer satisfaction with a minimal effort. Engaging the different players across your organization early and with the proper preparation will guarantee your success. Take these points into your social engagement conversations and apply what you already know well to make the most of your efforts.

Not sure where to begin? Let Avaya help you bring social media into your business. Leverage our experienced consultants, create and improve your social media engagement strategy. Join our Avaya Get Smart Webinar, Avaya Social Media Solutions – Consumer Behaviors, on Tuesday November 11 at 12noon ET. This webinar will focus on best practices for tracking social media engagements, contact center integration options, and more! Learn about Avaya Social Media Services and product offers.

Related Articles:

Call it what you will: Multi-channel, Omnichannel—It isn’t about the Contact Center!

At this point, we know that most companies are competing exclusively on the customer experience (83%, according to Dimension Data). McKinsey Insights shows that effective customer journeys are impactful: increase revenue by up to 15%, boost customer satisfaction by up to 20%, and turn predictive insight into customers’ needs by up to 30%. The issue isn’t that companies fail to understand the importance of the customer experience (CX). The problem is that over half of companies today fail to grasp what is arguably the single most important driver of a successful CX strategy: organizational alignment.

This isn’t to say that companies aren’t taking the necessary steps to strengthen their CX strategies. Looking back five years ago, 92% of organizations were already working to integrate multiple interaction channels—call it multi-channel, omnichannel, digital transformation—to deliver more consistent, contextualized experiences. The needle is moving in the right direction. However, companies will find themselves in a stalemate if they limit the customer experience to the contact center.

Customer Experience is the Entire Brand Journey

That’s right, the customer experience is NOT about the contact center. In fact, it never was. The customer experience is instead about seamlessly supporting consumers across their entire brand journey regardless of where, when, how and with whom it happens. This means supporting not just one business area (i.e., the contact center), but the entire organization as one living, breathing entity. This means supporting not just one single interaction, but the entire experience a customer has with a company from start to—well, forever. After all, the customer journey never truly ends.

Are companies ready for this future of the customer experience? Perhaps not: 52% of companies currently don’t share customer intelligence outside of the contact center, according to Deloitte.

Executives are planning for not only contact channels to expand but most are expecting these interaction journeys to grow in complexity. It’s clear that a contact-center-only structure doesn’t cut it anymore. At today’s rate of growth and change, it’s easy to see how a CX strategy can miss the mark when the entire customer journey is being limited to the contact center. Imagine how much stronger a company would perform if it supported the customer experience as the natural enterprise-wide journey it is? A journey where interactions take place across multiple channels and devices, unfolding across multiple key areas of business (i.e., sales, HR, billing, marketing)?

Imagine, for instance, a hospital immediately routing an outpatient to the travel nurse who cared for him last week, although she is now on the road to her next location. Imagine a bank being able to automatically route a customer to a money management expert after seeing that the last five questions asked via live chat were about account spending. Imagine a salesperson knowing that a customer attended a webinar last week on a new product launch and had submitted three questions—all before picking up the phone. Imagine a retail store associate knowing you walked in and that you were searching online for formal attire.

Contextual Awareness is Critical

Today’s CX strategy is no longer about asking the right questions: it’s about having the right information at the right time to drive anticipatory engagement. It’s no longer about being able to resolve a customer issue quickly. It’s about building an authentic, organization-wide relationship based on contextual awareness. In short, this means companies being able to openly track, measure, and share customer data across all teams, processes, and customer touch points. This ability either makes or breaks the CX today.

So, are you near the breaking point? Consider that nearly 40% of executives say their agents’ top frustration is that they can’t access all of the information they need. Less than 25% of contact centers today enjoy full collaboration on process design with their entire enterprise. Connected customer journeys and the overall CX are now top areas of focus as most organizations support up to nine channel options. CX will encounter a dramatic shift of reimagined customer engagements that will be able to incorporate technologies such as artificial intelligence, IoT, analytics, and augmented reality and virtual reality.

The bottom line is this: organizations must support an enterprise-wide customer journey to support the future of the CX now! They must share contextual data inside and outside of the contact center, and they need seamless and immediate access to that data anytime, anywhere, under any given circumstance. Above all, organizations need the right architectural foundation to support this anytime, anywhere ecosystem—otherwise, even their best moves will always result in a draw.

Get out of the Queue: Drive Your CX with Attribute Matching

At this point, nearly every company is working overtime to realign around two simple words: customer experience (CX). So much so that nearly 90% of companies now compete solely on CX—a drastic increase from 36 % in 2010—and 50 % of consumer product investments are expected to be redirected to CX innovations—like attribute matching—by the end of this year.

But what exactly does the CX consist of, especially in today’s new world of digital business innovation? This next-generation CX is supported by several advanced technologies—big data analytics, omnichannel, automation—however, these investments are all aimed at driving one thing: contextualization.

The rise of contextualized service—the ability for companies to not only gain insightful information about their customers but also deliver information in a way that is relevant and meaningful to customers based on individual circumstances to improve their experience—has evolved the CX to a point where it looks virtually nothing like it did as recently as 10 years ago. Whereas consumers once primarily focused on the act of purchasing, driven by such things as product quality and price, they now focus on the richness of brand relationships, driven by the personal value that companies deliver throughout the customer journey. Just consider that 70% of buying experiences are now based on how customers feel they are being treated. This is the key factor that sets apart market leaders like Amazon, Trader Joe’s, and Apple from the competition.

According to Accenture, there is an estimated $6 trillion in global revenue up for grabs due to dissatisfied customers constantly switching providers. The ability for companies to offer contextualized service is vital for operating at the speed of the consumer and capturing more of this market share. There’s just one thing preventing companies from seizing this limitless potential: the traditional call queue.

Every customer is familiar with the call queue. This is the place where statements like, “Your call is important to us. Please continue to hold,” and “Let me transfer you to a specialized team who can help you with that” perpetually live. It’s where exhaustive efforts to route customers to the correct service rep become lost, or where consumers must repeat the same information to multiple agents across different teams. It’s the greatest barrier preventing companies from being more dynamically connected to their consumers, and one of the greatest reasons why customers reduce their commitment to a brand.

Driving Contextualization with Attribute Matching

In a world where customers demand a profound level of connection and transparency, organizations can no longer support a contact center environment in which calls are distributed among agents who are organized by function (i.e., sales, service, support). In today’s smart, digital world, companies must transform the traditional call center into an integrated, digital communications hub. This means moving away from a siloed, metric-driven queue and instead working to put customers in touch with the best organizational resource depending on their exact need or circumstance as immediately as possible. The most effective way to achieve this is to migrate from archaic infrastructure towards an integrated, agile, next-generation platform built on open communications architecture.

Open communications architecture allows organizations to seamlessly collect, track and share contextual data across various teams, processes, and customer touch points. This integrated environment supports a real-time data repository from which businesses can pull from to route customers based on needs beyond traditional characteristics (like language preference). Rather, the technology allows companies to build customized learning algorithms that drive anticipatory engagement, enabling them to match customers based on next-level variables like personality, emotion and relatability.

Imagine, for example, a hotel routing a customer directly to an IT staffer after seeing that the person tweeted about a poor in-room Wi-Fi connection. Imagine a bank being able to route a customer to a money management expert after seeing that the last five questions asked via live chat were about account spending. Imagine an athletic apparel company matching a customer with an agent who is an avid runner after noticing that the individual recently signed up for a 5K.

The future of the CX means creating and continually building a contextualized view of customers throughout their entire brand journey. It means going beyond customer service to establish unparalleled, organization-wide relationships. It means transforming peoples’ lives, verses simply answering questions. This is what companies must work to align themselves with. The good news is that technology has evolved to a point where they can now easily, effectively and cost-efficiently do so.

Interested in learning more or getting beyond the queue to Redefine Your Customer and Employee Experiences? Contact us. We’d love to hear from you.

Reducing the Risks of Distributed Denial of Service Attacks

Picture what may just be one of the scariest scenarios in your career: The network has slowed to a crawl. You can barely hold a management interface, let alone control the network elements involved. The attack propagates, and as it does you watch your services drop one by one. Panic sets in. You’re experiencing a Denial of Service (DoS) attack. All resources are focused on stamping this fire out—and that may very well be the intention of the attackers.

A DoS attack might be a smokescreen to get you to focus elsewhere while the intruder goes about covert business in a much safer fashion, leaving little forensics afterward.

DoS attacks are an easy thing to comprehend. Even the term Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) is an easy extension. But the strategy behind why they’re used and their intent can vary dramatically. A DoS attack can occur in an array of sophistication. Here’s a quick breakout from the simplest to most complex attacks:

  • Network Level attacks:

    The simplest ones—TCP, UDP, ICMP, Floods

  • Reflective/Amplified attacks:

    Service focused—DNS, NTP, SNMP, SSDP, Specific floods

  • Fragmentation:

    Session specific—overlaps, missing, too many

  • Application specific:

    Repetitive GET, slow READ or loop calls

  • Crafted:

    Stack and protocol level, buffer resources

These methods are often overlapped in a targeted fashion. In essence the attack is a series of waves that each hit in varying degrees of sophistication and focus. Other times the attack is relatively primitive and easy to isolate. The reason for this is that in the simplest levels, it’s an easy thing to do. As an example, a disgruntled student, upset over a new vending matching policy, could mount a DoS attack against his or her school administration. On the other end of the spectrum is a much darker orchestration, the sleight of the hand to get you to look elsewhere. This is typically the signature of an Advanced Persistent Threat (APT).

Unless an attack is very simple and short-lived, it needs to be distributed in the way it operates. It needs to be generated from various points of origin. This is referred to as a DDoS attack. The attacker needs to coordinate a series of end points to execute some particular event at the same point in time or perhaps, in more sophisticated examples, as phased against a time series. For a DDoS attack, the attacker requires a command and control (C2) capability. This means that they need to have access and response to the compromised systems. This is referred to as a Botnet.

Botnets do not have to be sophisticated to be successful. They only have to implement a simple set of instructions at the right point in time. Let’s take the recent reflective/amplified DDoS attack on Dynamic DNS services on the East coast of the U.S., which affected several large firms such as Amazon and Yahoo. The attack was mounted from residential video surveillance cameras. Even though there was no direct intrusion, the firms were impacted. Which leads us to two lessons.

Lesson number one: Security in IoT needs to be taken more seriously in the product design stages. Perhaps the concept and treatment of residential security systems needs to be rethought.

Lesson number two: As we move to outsourcing and cloud services we need to realize that we spread the reality of our exposed risk. Due diligence is required to assure that service providers and partners are doing their role in end-to-end security. But do you recall I mentioned that the source of the orchestrated attack was from the residential network? This brings about a new degree of challenges as we look at the new world of consumer IoT.

How do we maintain security in that sector? Clearly the residence itself should uphold best practices with a well-maintained and monitored gateway. But let’s face it, this is generally not going to happen. The monitoring of behaviors and abnormalities at the provider interface level is the next best catch and many providers are moving to reach this goal.

The other key point to remember about botnets is that in order to command, one has to control. This can happen in various ways. One is automatic. It infects and sits until a predefined time and then activates. This is the simplest. Another method requires true C2. Either way, bad code gets residence or existing code gets leveraged in negative ways. You should be able to pick out the anomalies.

Proper design with hyper-segmentation can greatly reduce the risk of propagation from the initial infection. The botnet is contained and should be readily identified, if you’re watching. Are you?