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The Audio Conference Call is Dying. Here’s Why.

angry lady yelling at phone

The traditional conference call has taken quite a beating over the past few years. This David Grady spoof was the first “laugh so hard, I cried” satire I came across. I think what struck me with this one was each time I thought it was getting old, he threw in something that made me laugh even harder… for nearly five minutes!

This week, the video “A Conference Call in Real Life” by Tripp & Tyler is making its rounds through social media. It’s funny too, although I think I’m still partial to the David Grady version.  And just today, I came across an article on “the existential despair of the conference call,” to which one of my colleagues replied, “I laughed, I cried, I kept watching! This would be a good clip of what can (and does) go wrong … unless you use Scopia.” She did include a “winky face,” but the truth of the matter is that Scopia does overcome almost all the issues identified in these conference call parodies. Not the barking dog, of course, and not the random background noise, but Scopia does take out A LOT of the guesswork.

Sometimes, I feel like I’ve been at Avaya for years, and other times, I’m blown away that it’s already been 20 months since the acquisition of Radvision. Where have the past (almost) two years gone? When I look back at the changes I’ve seen at Avaya, one of the biggest is that we have an incredibly strong video conferencing culture. And if you think I’m making it up, the proof is in the numbers below:

avaya scopia in house usage

Last month, we had almost 40,000 video meetings on Avaya Scopia with 340,000+ attendees. From June 2012 through December 2013, we had more than half a million video meetings and have surpassed the 3 million mark on number of participants. That’s A LOT of video, and that doesn’t even count the video calls I host (which often feels like another half million or so per year :) ).

Why is video usage so high within Avaya? I have a few theories, and they go to the core of the spoofs mentioned above.

  1. Get rid of the unknown: When I joined Avaya, conference calls were mostly audio-only. As a newbie to an organization of 15,000+ employees, I never knew who was talking. I was constantly IMing colleagues asking, “Who’s speaking now?” With Scopia video, active speakers are highlighted in the virtual meeting room, and names are displayed. There’s never any question who’s speaking, and all participants are clearly identified in the participant list.
  2. A picture is worth a thousand words: The ability to see who is speaking and to read his/her body language as well as the body language of other participants is huge. You get fewer interruptions, fewer questions, and richer communication because your meetings are taking place face-to-face.
  3. Get on the same page: Content-sharing is easy on Scopia, and content is displayed in high definition. There’s no more asking, “Are we looking at the same page?” or “Can you send the deck you’re referring to?” What’s more, participants can easily scroll through content that’s already been presented without interrupting the active speaker (a feature that is totally unique to Scopia).
  4. The power of mute (and more): With Scopia, you always know who the speaker is thanks to active speaker tracking. That means you also know when someone is “speaking” without meaning to… i.e. furiously typing on their keyboard, crinkling papers, having a side conversation, etc. The beauty of Scopia is that all users –whether in a conference room, on Scopia Desktop or joining via Scopia Mobile – have full meeting moderation. That means you can mute the noisemakers without interrupting the call. The ability to mute the far end can be beautiful thing when you have a lot of people on the line. And Scopia moderation goes far beyond mute – you can add or disconnect participants, take “control” of content-sharing (without having to ask for it), change your layout so content appears larger or smaller, etc.

Of course, I’d be exaggerating if I said every Scopia call goes off without a hitch. But when I read articles or watch videos like those mentioned above, I have to say, the death of the traditional conference call must be on the horizon. Why use audio only when you can use video, too? If you ask me, video conferencing is a no brainer, especially with the leaps we’ve made in personal video conferencing at the desktop and on the go.

What are your thoughts? If you use video, have your conference calls been more effective? I’d love to hear from you.

Robin Raulf-Sager served as the Analyst Relations Director at Avaya, and formerly was the director of communications for Radvision, an Avaya company. Robin is passionate about unified communications and collaboration. She has an M.S. and a B.S. in communications from the University of Illinois. more

3 comments
kathleenrobert
kathleenrobert

I totally agree with your view that Video calling services are rapidly taking over audio conferencing services. It was barely a few years ago, when people thought that audio conference calls are the best for all types of companies. However with the advent of video calling services, and the added feautres they offer, it is not surprising that video calling is gaining popularity at the expense of audio conference calling.

Martypoe
Martypoe

I'm sorry but after 25 years in the telecom business I have seen this argument come and go.  conference calling has always been problematic.  Basically, it stinks.  Video conferencing came along strong in the 90's but hardly made a dent in the conferencing market.  Now, with all the collaboration and UC it seems finally the traditional call in conferencing will fade away, but I doubt it.

Business seems to have a tolerance for known difitiancies (sp?) Telecom employees have learned to prepare meetings ahead of time, based on importance of the meeting, to ensure the meeting is successful and most likely preserving their own jobs.

Don't get me wrong, I think todays interactive video collaboration is going to increase productivity exponentially, but it will not replace the traditional conference call.  It will take a generation to cycle out the engrained business management mindset (paradigm) Todays techie will eventually be making enterprise decisions and will then start to phase out traditional confrerence calling.