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3 Simple Ways to Prevent Future E911 Tragedies

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In nearly every industry, there is a close bond between customer, distributor and manufacturer. Strategically, companies become loyal to a specific brand, and in certain cases, to a specific technician or distributor. This is typically based on individuals going above and beyond or doing, what I commonly call, “the right thing.”

What exactly is the right thing? While it’s hard to put a finger on any specific action, it’s more of an attitude–a way of thinking, or persona that you develop. Shortly after Christmas, I got a call from a good friend of mine, Jim Colella, who runs a successful mid-tier telecommunications company, TelServ, LLC in Cromwell, CT.

When I worked as an end-user at a large global financial institution, Jim was employed by a large nationwide distributor, and was my service manager. We had several on-site technicians, and 30,000 or more ports in the New England area alone.

To say the least, it was a difficult account for anyone to manage, and even though we planned thoroughly, upgrades and weekend maintenance would once in a while go awry. Many times, in the middle of the night, I would wake Jim up from a dead sleep screaming about some problem, only to be met with a calm, soothing, “Fletch, everything will be all right. Just relax, we have our best people on it and will have you back to normal in no time at all.”

Eventually, Jim went out and started TelServ with a few colleagues, and maintained that calm attitude with every account they took on. He understood the value of going that extra mile, knowing that it would pay back over and over again in customer loyalty.

After the recent E911 tragedy in Texas in December 2013, where the 9-year-old daughter of Kari Hunt tried to desperately called 911 from a hotel, but did not know she needed to dial “9” first, Jim called me to make sure that he and his team understood what the problem was, and what they could do to protect their customers from the same issue.

I took this as an opportunity to see the brand-new facility they had just purchased and moved into in Connecticut, as well as an opportunity to sit down with his staff to work out a plan for their customers. I ended up doing an in-depth presentation on how E911 works, and then went over the three basic, built-in features in the PBX that would address many of the systems out there. These are the same things that I covered in my open letter to FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler.

In that letter, I stated:

There are three simple steps, if addressed from a legislation perspective that will go a long way to remediate this problem to ensure that the number of tragedies such as the one that took the life of Kari Hunt will be significantly diminished if not entirely eliminated.

9-1-1 dialing from any telephone device, without the need for an access code
While dialing an access code (such as 9-9-1-1) should also be recognized, a requirement should be in place so that the dialed digits of 9-1-1 are recognized and properly routed to emergency services.

Immediate routing to 9-1-1
The interception of a 9-1-1 call event, and local answering by non-certified and/or untrained on-site personnel has become a dangerous and alarming trend. This practice jeopardizes the safety of callers with emergencies by allowing untrained individuals to answer emergency calls. This delays the response by trained and appropriate public safety officials at a point in time where seconds count in an emergency. This sub-optimal practice must be curtailed and rectified.

On-site notification or alerting that an emergency call has been initiated
Access to large buildings and facilities can be complicated. Internally- trained responders can be of great assistance to public safety officials in an emergency. On-site notification can ensure those in-house personnel that “need to know” have the appropriate information to both expedite an internal response and be prepared for first responders when they arrive at the building.

To say the least, everyone in the room was shocked and amazed how such simple steps could make a tremendous difference, and almost everyone had two or three different accounts that could immediately benefit from these three simple configuration tasks.

It was then that a brilliant idea emerged from the group. Since TelServ customers on maintenance already had their systems monitored by the brand-new NOC, it would be a simple, remote procedure to examine the customer systems, and determine the current status of E911 programming, and then come up with a remediation plan that would implement the three steps previously noted.

The coolest part about this plan was that Jim decided that this extra service would be done at NO CHARGE to existing maintenance customers, and only a basic service fee would be applicable to any customer who wanted to check their compliance status.

So not only is he bringing awareness to his customers about a potentially deadly problem, he’s reaching out to his local community and “doing the right thing.” I’m honored to have such good friends, who share the honesty, integrity and moral values that I do with the customers that they do business with.

It sets a shining example for everyone in the industry, because if a smaller, mid-tier distributor can take on an action such as this, it’s only logical that the larger, national distributors could do the same thing.

In fact, I’ll extend an open invitation to assist ANY Avaya channel partner in developing a remediation program for E911 for their customers, as well as raise awareness across the industry of a problem that shouldn’t exist.



Want more technology, news and information from Avaya? Be sure to check out the Avaya Podcast Network landing page at http://avaya.com/APN. There, you will find additional podcasts from industry events, such as Avaya Evolutions and INTEROP, as well as other informative series by the APN staff.

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Thanks for stopping by and reading the Avaya Connected blog on E9-1-1. I value your opinions, so please feel free to comment below or, if you prefer, email me privately.

Public comments, suggestions, corrections and loose change is all graciously accepted ;-)
Until next week… dial carefully.

Be sure to follow me on Twitter @Fletch911

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Mark J. Fletcher, ENP is the Chief Architect for Worldwide Public Safety Solutions at Avaya. As a seasoned professional with nearly 30 years of service, he provides the strategic roadmap and direction of Next Generation Emergency Services in both the Enterprise and Government portfolios at Avaya. In 2014, Fletcher was made a member of the NENA Institute Board in the US, and co-chair of the EENA NG112 Committee in the EU, where he provides insight to State and Federal legislators globally driving forward both innovation and compliance. more

1 comments
Karina Yandell
Karina Yandell

I loved reading this. When it comes right down to it, organizations should address E911 not because of legislation or compliance concerns but because it's just the right thing to do. Thanks for sharing.